Vai al contenuto
  • Sky
  • Blueberry
  • Slate
  • Blackcurrant
  • Watermelon
  • Strawberry
  • Orange
  • Banana
  • Apple
  • Emerald
  • Chocolate
  • Charcoal
Accedi per seguire questo  
Fidelio

Chttp://www.lamoneta.it/topic/137481-curiosit%C3%A0-julia-domna-bimetallico/uriosità Julia Domna bimetallico

Risposte migliori

Fidelio

NAC 84 lotto 1951

 

Non sapevo dell'esistenza di queste soluzioni di coniazione! :dirol:

Non vengono mezionate le caratteristiche dei due metalli.

Esistono altri esempi di vostra conoscenza?

 

1682324l.jpg

  • Mi piace 1

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

Illyricum65

Ciao,

ne avevo sentito parlare ma non avevo mai visto (o quantomeno non ricordo) un esemplare con questa evidenza visiva! Sembra un 2€!

Per la cronaca il peso è maggiore dello standard dei sesterzi ma non è riportato il diametro:

Bi-metallic medallion 218 or 222, Æ 31.11 g. Veiled and draped bust r. Rev. Julia, veiled, holding sceptre, seated on peacock flying r. C 25. RIC Caracalla 609 and S. Severus 71b.
Very rare. A wonderful portrait of fine style, brown tone and very fine
Ex Ars Classica sale XVII, 1934, Evans, 1561.

 

Si tratto in genere di una tecnica utilizzata per i sesterzi e (maggiormente) i medaglioni. Non si sa se fossero monete immesse nel flusso monetale o semplice "gettoni" emessi a scopo onorifico.

 

Di un sesterzio di Traiano si parla nel testo di cui al link:

http://zenon.dainst.org/Record/000458924/HierarchyTree?hierarchy=000598301&recordID=000458924

 

Eccone uno:

post-3754-0-68777100-1430683894_thumb.jp

Caracalla (198-217), Sesterzio bimetallico, Roma, 214 d.C.; AE (g 32,71; mm 32; h 1); M AVR ANTONINVS PIVS FELIX AVG, busto laureato e corazzato a d., Rv. P M TR P XVII IMP III COS IIII P P, l’imperatore, seguito da due attendenti, stante su di un podio verso d. nell’atto di arringare le truppe; sullo sfondo, degli stendardi; in ex. S C. RIC 525c var (busto drappeggiato); C -; Cayòn -; Banti 59. Molto raro, ritratto vigoroso e rovescio molto dettagliato; patina marrone, q.spl - spl.

http://acr-auctions.bidinside.com/it/lot/861/caracalla-198-217-sesterzio-bimetallico-roma-/

 

Buona conservazione, evidenza molto più sfumata.

 

Per i medaglioni, qui ne trovi uno di Alessandro Severo

http://www.lamoneta.it/topic/98379-medaglioni-per-tutti/

 

O qui (rovescio)

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Medaglione_bimetallico_di_faustina_madre,_141_dc,_verso_con_cibele_sul_carro_trainato_da_leoni.JPG

 

Ciao

Illyricum

;)

Modificato da Illyricum65
  • Mi piace 3

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

Fidelio

Molto interessante! Grazie per il tuo intervento @@Illyricum65, come sempre molto esaustivo.

 

Ho trovato altri esempi:

 

812474.jpg

Commodus. AD 177-192. Æ and Orichalcum Medallion (41mm, 60.04 g, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 189-190. M COMMODVS ANTONINV-S PIVS FELIX AVG BRIT, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left / VOTIS FELICIBVS, Commodus standing left, sacrificing over tripod placed at entrance of a harbor;to left, five vessels advancing right; pharos to right; slain bull below. Gnecchi 174; MIR 18, 1139-1/38; cf. Banti 522; Grueber 136; Froehner p. 125; Tocci -; Dressel -. Good VF, ricer patina, minor roughness. Exceptional scenery. Very rare.
Ex Leo Benz Collection (Lanz 94, 22 November 1999), lot 674

 

11368963716_356cc5e779_b.jpg

Gordian III. AD 238-244. Bimetallic Medallion (37mm, 65.96 g, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 243-244. GORDIANVS PIVS FELIX AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust left, wearing balteus, holding spear over shoulder in left hand, in right a shield decorated with emperor on horseback to left, spearing enemy, being trailed by a soldier / PA X AETERNA, Gordian, in military attire, standing left, being crowned by Victory, holding signum in left hand and sacrificing over altar from patera held in right; to left, signum and reclining figures of the Tigris and Euphrates; above and in background, Sol, raising right hand in salutation and holding signum in left, standing facing, head left, in spread quadriga. Gnecchi II, p. 89, 24, pl. 104, 7-8 (same obv. die); Banti 57 (same obv. die); Cohen 172. Good VF, green patina, peripheral roughness. Very rare.

Ex Münzen und Medaillen Washington (7 December 1997), lot 361.

CNGTRITONXVII, 773

This impressive medallion was struck during the campaigns against the Sasanians led by Timesitheus, praetorian prefect and father-in-law of Gordian III. More specifically, it very likely commemorates the victory of the Romans at the Battle of Rhesaena in AD 243, when the Sasanians were driven back over the Euphrates. Neither Timesitheus nor Gordian III returned from the campaigns, both having died in the east under mysterious circumstances, possibly at the hands of Philip the Arab, although Sasanian sources tell us Gordian III died in battle.

The patinas on bimetallic medallions typically mask the impressive contrast of color that they would have possessed when first struck. Originally, the red, copper rims would have attractively framed the types found on the golden–hued, orichalcum center.

 

r7ooz9.jpg

Commodus. Æ Bimetallic Medallion. Rome, AD 189. M COMMODVS ANTONINVS PIVS FELIX AVG BRIT, laureate draped and cuirassed bust right / MINER VICT P M TR P XIIII IMP VIII, Minerva, helmeted, wearing chiton and himation, standing left, holding spear in left hand and Victory on right; oval shield at feet to left, trophy of arms with shields at base to right; COS V P P in exergue. Gnecchi II, p. 57, 48; MIR p. 18, 1132 (issue 59/60). 70.01g, 41mm, 6h.
Very Fine. Extremely Rare.
Ex Numismatik Lanz 145, 5 January 2009, lot 127;
Ex Egger XXXIX, 15 January 1912, lot 1057;
Deaccessioned from the collection of Emperor Franz Josef I of Austria.
Medallions were struck relatively often during this period, produced by the mint of Rome toward the end of the year, their purpose being not for financial circulation but for distribution as commemorative gifts to foreign dignitaries or other persons of merit. Their bimetallic composition was for primarily aesthetic reasons, and a means by which Rome (and the mint workers) could show off a technical accomplishment.
Commodus is often credited by the ancient sources with the near destruction of the Roman Empire, through a combination of disinterest in the governance of Rome and an all-consuming belief that he was of god-like status. With his accession, says the contemporary historian Cassius Dio, 'our history now descends from a kingdom of gold to one of iron and rust, as affairs did for the Romans of that day' (LXXII.36.4).
By the latter years of his reign when this medallion was struck, Commodus believed Hercules was his divine patron, and he worshipped him so intensely that eventually he came to believe himself an incarnation of the mythological hero, reinforcing the image he was cultivating of himself as a demigod who, as the son of Jupiter, was the representative of the supreme god of the Roman pantheon. The growing megalomania of the emperor permeated all areas of Roman life, as is witnessed in the material record by the innumerable statues erected around the empire that had been set up portraying him in the guise of Hercules, and his coinage.

 

 

Philipp I. Arabs, 244 - 249 n. Chr. AE Bimetallisches Medaillon (73,08g). 244 n. Chr. Mzst. Rom. Vs.: IMP CAES M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, drapierte Panzerbüste mit Lorbeerkranz n. r. Rs.: P M TR P COS P P, Kaiser in Militärtracht mit Zepter, links Soldat mit Standarte, rechts Soldat mit Aquila u. ein weiterer mit Schild u. Lanze. C. 115; Gnecchi II S. 94 Nr. 4 mit Taf. 107,3 (stgl.).

RR! Dunkelbraune Patina, ss
Ex Slg. Benz; ex Lanz 100, 2000, 262.

 

 

Septimius Severus. (193-211), Bimetallic Medallion, Rome, AD 207-211; AE (g 67,20; mm 41; h 1); L SEPT SEVERVS PIVS - AVG IMP XII PART MAX, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust r., Rv. [CONCORDIAE ?], Geta and Caracalla (?) clasping hands, surrounded by other figures; in ex. AVGG. C -; Gnecchi - (but see the stylistic affinities with the Caracalla bimetallic medallion, Gnecchi III, pl. 95, 3).
Apparently unique and unpublished. Two old holes drilled 180° from each other in edge, good very fine / very fine.

 

image00183.jpg

Severus Alexander. AD 222-235. Medallion (Bimetallic, copper and orichalcum, 37mm, 40 g 12), Rome, 224. IMP CAES M AVREL SEV ALEXANDER AVG Laureate and draped bust of Severus Alexander to right. Rev. PONTIF MAX TR P III COS P P The Amphitheatrum Flavianum (”The Colosseum”). It is shown from the front, with four stories: the first with arches, the second with arches containing statues, the third with flat-topped pedimented niches containing statues, and the fourth with square windows and circular clupea; in a bird’s eye view the circular interior can also be seen with two tiers of spectators. Outside, to left, Severus Alexander stands right sacrificing over a low altar; behind him is the Meta Sudans and a large statue of Sol. To right, a two-storied distyle building with two pediments and a male statue (Jupiter?) before. Apparently unpublished, but see Gnecchi II, p. 80, 9 (obverse) and Gnecchi III, p. 42 = Toynbee pl. 29, 7 (the reverse). See also BMC 156-157 and Cohen 468 for sestertii with the same types (but dating to 223). Unique and of great importance. With a fine and attractive green patina and a portrait in high relief. Some minor deposits, otherwise, extremely fine.


From a Swiss private collection, ex Nummorum Auctiones 8, 4 December 1997, 313.

The Flavian Amphitheater was begun in AD 72 by Vespasian and finished in 80 by Titus; it was apparently financed from the booty gained from the Jewish War. It is, of course, one of the best known buildings in the world, and was originally used for spectacles of all kinds, including gladiatorial contests, and animal hunts. The name Colosseum comes from a huge statue of Nero (a Colossus) that stood nearby (Nero’s head was removed and repeatedly replaced by the head of a reigning emperor in the guise of Sol): this statue was only pulled down and melted at some point between the 8th century and the year 1000 (it appears on the left on this coin). The building on the right is possibly the Temple of Jupiter Victor, which Severus Alexander dedicated in 224. The coin itself commemorates the rededication of the Amphtheater after repair of much of the damage caused by a severe fire in the wooden stands that was started by a lightening bolt in 217 (complete repairs only finished in 240).

Modificato da Fidelio
  • Mi piace 6

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

acraf

Ottima carrellata. Ma non ho capito un dettaglio sopra riportato e che ripeto:

 

The patinas on bimetallic medallions typically mask the impressive contrast of color that they would have possessed when first struck. Originally, the red, copper rims would have attractively framed the types found on the golden–hued, orichalcum center.

 

Ossia l'uso bimetallismo era per creare un contrasto di colore, con bordo esterno in rame e quindi di colore rossiccio rispetto al centro in oricalco e quindi con colore vicino all'oro.

Almeno da alcuni esempi sopra illustrati noto che è il contrario, ossia è il bordo ad essere giallo e il centro rosso, quindi l'oricalco è limitato all'esterno e non all'interno del medagliore.... Giusto?

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

acraf

Invece un centro costituito da oricalco e il bordo da rame (o bronzo) si rinviene in questo particolare dupondio di Claudio (trasformato in medaglione):

 

post-7204-0-18732700-1430864020.jpg

 

Claudius Bimetallic Dupondius. Rome, AD 41-50. TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, bare head left / CERES AVGVSTA, Ceres, veiled and draped, seated left on ornamental throne, holding corn ears and long torch, SC in exergue. RIC 94. 20.31g, 23mm, 7h.

  • Mi piace 2

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

Fidelio

Ottima carrellata. Ma non ho capito un dettaglio sopra riportato e che ripeto:

 

The patinas on bimetallic medallions typically mask the impressive contrast of color that they would have possessed when first struck. Originally, the red, copper rims would have attractively framed the types found on the golden–hued, orichalcum center.

 

Ossia l'uso bimetallismo era per creare un contrasto di colore, con bordo esterno in rame e quindi di colore rossiccio rispetto al centro in oricalco e quindi con colore vicino all'oro.

Almeno da alcuni esempi sopra illustrati noto che è il contrario, ossia è il bordo ad essere giallo e il centro rosso, quindi l'oricalco è limitato all'esterno e non all'interno del medagliore.... Giusto?

 Hai perfettamente ragione @@acraf, temo che abbiano scritto una sciocchezza per la descrizione del medaglione di Gordiano. Infatti, l'effetto erroneamente descritto è quello visibile per Commodo e Settimo Severo ossia nel centro il rame ed il contorno aureo!

Modificato da Fidelio

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

Fidelio

Un altro esemplare davvero affascinante.

 

83000324.jpg

Commodus. AD 177-192. Bimetallic Medallion (63.85 g, 12h). Rome mint. Struck 10-31 December AD 192. L AELIVS • AVRELIVS • COMMODVS AVG PIVS FELIX, head of Commodus as Hercules left, wearing lion skin headdress tied at neck / HERCVLI ROMANO AVG P M TR P XVIII COS VII P P, Commodus as Hercules, nude, standing facing, head right, resting right hand on club set on ground, and left on left rear paw of corpse of Nemean Lion set on ground head first. Gnecchi 33/32 (obv./rev.); MIR 18, 1165-1/73; Banti 112/107 (obv./rev.); Grueber -; Froehner -; Tocci -; Dressel -; Toynbee, pp. 74-75. Good VF, untouched bi-colored patina with central section of black-green and outer ring of lighter green, minute traces of encrustation in some of the devices. An apparently unique die pairing in this extremely small issue, meant to celebrate the “New Year” of Commodus’s TR P XVIII.
During the latter part of his reign, Commodus began associating himself with Hercules. While the Antonine emperors had traditionally associated themselves with the divine hero, Commodus appropriated the iconography more aggressively by wearing a lion skin and carrying a club, both main attributes of Hercules, and having statues of himself dressed as the god erected throughout the empire (for a bust of Commodus as Hercules, see Capitoline bust [inv. MC 1120]; for the use of Herculean images on provincial issues of Commodus, see http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/).The appropriation of this imagery went to apparently megalomaniacal lengths. According to Dio (73.15), Commodus in AD 190 ordered that the names of the months be changed to correspond with his name and titles – Lucius Aelius Aurelius Commodus Augustus Herculeus Romanus Exsuperatorius Amazonius Invictus Felix Pius, and that each legion replace its epithet with Commodiana. Shortly thereafter, when fire had destroyed a large section of Rome, Commodus used it as an opportunity to re-found the city as a whole and, thereby, identify himself completely with Hercules, who was considered the founder of many ancient Greek cities. Commodus ordered the restored city to be called Colonia Lucia Annia Commodiana, its citizens were now know as Commodiani, and the Senate was restyled as the Senatus Commodianus Fortunatus. All of this revitalization on his part, Commodus believed, would bring about a new Golden Age. In the autumn of AD 192, Commodus officially adopted the name Hercules; it was at this time that his portrait on the coinage began to show him wearing a lion skin. This transformation was brief, however, for, on 31 December AD 192, only three weeks after assuming the tribunician power for the eighteenth time, he was assassinated by an athlete in his bath.

The coinage of Commodus dated TR P XVIII is virtually non existent (apart from a single recorded denarius and sestertius), indicating that the issue’s production had not yet gotten into full swing when Commodus was assassinated. The series of medallions, however, which forms a homogeneous group (based on the close die-links), and which totaled thirty-nine known specimens at the time Toynbee published her book, consists of six types. The obverses all show Commodus wearing the lion skin, while the reverses allude in some way to Hercules, who bears a distinct resemblance on some examples to the emperor. All are struck on bimetallic flans and, apart from the type showing the emperor plowing the pomerium, which was a medallic version of a very rare type struck earlier in AD 192, they are of a new type unknown to the regular coinage. These medals, unlike the similarly dated coinage, were meant to be ready for presentation to specific recipients within the government and the military on Commodus’ eighteenth tribunician anniversary, rather than on 1 January AD 193, at which time (or shortly thereafter) Commodus would have had the new consuls murdered and assume the consulship for himself (Dio 72.22). These medallions then were the preparation for what was to follow with the regular issues of coinage the following year: the transformation of Commodus into the physical manifestation of the god Hercules, the son of Jupiter, who would rule his empire from his capital city, which was populated by his people and governed through his Senate.

  • Mi piace 1

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

acraf

L'aspetto più intrigante è il tondello centrale risulta ritagliato praticamente al centro della leggenda intorno alle figure.

Un esempio di tondello centrale di un medaglione, che ha perso l'anello circostante:

 

post-7204-0-99339700-1430908198_thumb.jp

 

Non sarebbe stato più logico ritagliare il tondello con tutta la leggenda e subito all'esterno aggiungere l'anello circolare di metallo diverso....

In ogni caso sarebbe interessante capire le esatte modalità di coniazione di un simile sistema bimetallismo

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

Poemenius

la butto li... spero non mi uccidano di critiche :)

 

credo che la scelta fosse obbligata....

probabilmente preparavano i tondelli, li mettevano insieme, li scaldavano e l'abbinamento si saldava proprio grazie alla forza generata dai colpi che coniavano.

 

probabilmente arrivare a centrare perfettamente la legenda sul solo tondello esterno era veramente difficile.... e in più così si dava davvero l'impressione di un unica coniatura su moneta bimetallica....

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

palpi62

Questo di Nerone trovato in rete, sembra tri-metallico.

 

 

 

post-12140-0-44046600-1430917937_thumb.j

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

Fidelio

Trovo interessanti le ipotesi aperte da @@acraf e @@Poemenius, se ne potrebbe avviare una buona discussione in quanto non mi sembra di reperire materiali di studio al riguardo se non qualche accenno.

 

Da ciò che ho potuto leggere in alcuni libri si può affermare che queste medaglie venivano concesse dall'imperatore prevalentemente come doni onorari. Chi le riceveva applicava talvolta su di esse un occhiello o un appiccagnolo per potersene fregiare come simboli dell'onore ricevuto. Begli esemplari di questo tipo sono stati rinvenuti al di fuori dei confini dell'impero romano. Si pensa che abbiano costituito un mezzo per mantenere relazioni di buon vicinato con i capi dei popoli barbari confinanti. In altri termini Roma era disposta a ricompensare i comportamenti virtuosi ed il tributo in oro veniva talora pagato sotto questa forma. Alcuni imperatori, specialmente nel tardo impero, concedevano alcuni di questi medaglioni a ufficiali di alto rango della guardia pretoria per "comprare" la loro fedeltà.

 

E' a partire dal regno di Traiano che la produzione di medaglioni bronzei inizia ad aumentare, fino a toccare l'apice sotto i regni di Adriano e degli Antonini, soprattutto con Commodo, per poi diminuire dopo il periodo di quest'ultimo. Raramente i medaglioni mostrano la sigla SC come nella monetazione ordinaria. Questa mancanza è stata giustificata come voluta dalle autorità emittenti per non far confondere i medaglioni con le monete ordinarie. Di solito, i medaglioni che recano la sigla SC erano di competenza senatoria, quelli senza di competenza imperiale. Almeno questa l'opinione dei principali studiosi.

Sui medaglioni, in metallo prezioso o meno, erano raffigurati, di solito, scene importanti e di qualche rilevanza per la vita imperiale (trionfi, voti pubblici, etc.) e, a causa di numerosi ritrovamenti di medaglioni in zone militari lungo i confini dell'Impero, si è ipotizzato che questi fossero stati usati come donativi ai soldati (non a caso su alcuni medaglioni è celebrata la liberalità dell'Imperatore) o ad ufficiali dello stato maggiore. Alcuni medaglioni in bronzo presentano coniato un solo lato, quello che reca l'immagine del sovrano, e si pensa che venissero inviati nelle Province o nelle zone remote dell'Impero per essere usati come "modelli" nelle zecche ufficiali dove venivano usati, oltre che per riprodurre le fattezze dell'Imperatore, anche come prove. L'unico medaglione in piombo conosciuto, infatti, è considerato una prova per uno mai realizzato. Alcuni medaglioni non sono altro che normalissimi sesterzi o dupondi del I secolo d.C., con un flan di diametro maggiore, cerchiati da una fascia di metallo. Questi sono detti "monete montate" eseguite, cioè, "incorniciando" una moneta di normale circolazione. L'unica cosa è che il tondello ha un diametro più grande del solito come il Nerone che ha postato @@palpi62.

O mi sbaglio?

Modificato da Fidelio

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

cliff

Per i medaglioni romani il testo piu' accessibile e ancora abbastanza aggiornato rimane il "Roman Medallions" di J.M.C. Toynbee,1944 (ma facilmente rintracciabile nella ristampa ANS del 1986); ha ancora qualche valenza piu' che altro come riferimento anche il vecchio Froenher "NUMISMATIQUE ANTIQUE. LES MÉDAILLONS DE L'EMPIRE ROMAIN DEPUIS LE RÈGNE D'AUGUSTE JUSQU'À PRISCUS ATTALE". Paris: J. Rothschild, 1878.

Anche i tre volumi dell'ottima opera omnia di Francesco Gnecchi, I medaglioni Romani, 1912, sono ancora un utile lavoro di riferimento con delle ottime tavole, soprattutto nell'edizione originale.

 

In realtà come sta succedendo da qualche anno a questa parte i lavori piu' avanzati ed aggiornati sulla materia sono ormai in tedesco, e nello specifico il lavoro di riferimento è ormai P.F.Mittag, "Romische Medaillon", Franz Steiner Verlag 2012. Questo è solo il primo volume di cui si attende il secondo ma sono stati introdotti nuovi concetti sulla sistemazione e sull'utilizzo dei medaglioni riordinandoli nel periodo pre-adrianeo e da Adriano in avanti. Una successiva sistemazione per diametro,peso e design è poi adottata.

 

Ho avuto notizia in realtà anche di un'altra interessante opera, in italiano, di Francesca Barenghi, "I medaglioni romani imperiali da Augusto al 284 d. C. : studio storico-tipologico, 1996", ma tale opera purtroppo sembra non sia facilmente consultabile in quanto credo sia una tesi di dottorato non pubblicata. Se qualcuno ne avesse notizia sarei interessato a consultarla.

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

VALTERI

Sui medaglioni romani , ho ricordo di una mia sola lettura , ormai lontana , con poco più di un cenno all'esistenza , tra questi ,  di esemplari bimetallici .

 

Una mia curiosità .

 

Gli esemplari bimetallici , particolari tra i già particolari medaglioni , sono prodotti coevi ai personaggi che vi sono rappresentati , o potrebbero essere coevi tra di loro , tipo , ad esempio , i contorniati ?

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

Fidelio

Ringrazio @@cliff per aver ricordato quali opere sono in corso per questo argomento, credo si possa aggiungere tra i piu recenti anche l'opera di Toynbee, Jocelyn M.C. 1944. Roman Medallions. New York; che ho appena individuato ma trovo piu interessante poter reperire Francesca Barenghi, "I medaglioni romani imperiali da Augusto al 284 d.C..

 

Nel frattempo posto un altro esemplare per chi si vuole rifare gli occhi.

nmdph3.jpg

Commodus. AD 177-192. Bimetallic Medallion (62.85 g, 12h). Rome mint. Struck A.D. 186.

Obverse: Bearded and laureate bust of Commodus to left, holding spear with right hand and wearing aegis. MCOMMODVSANTONINV SPIVSFELIXAVGBRIT Reverse: Emperor in triumphal quadriga to right, the chariot ornamented with reliefs. PMTRPXIIMPVII in exergue: COSVPP

By date unknown: Earl Fitzwilliam Collection; by 1949: with Christie, Manson & Woods, Ltd., Spencer House, 27 St. James's Place, St. James's Streeet, London, S.W. 1 (Christie's auction of the Earl Fitzwilliam Collection, sold by order of the Earl Fitzwilliam's Wentworth Estates Company, May 30-31, 1949, lot 356); by date unknown: U.S. Private Collection; Anonymous gift to MFA in memory of Prof. George H. Chase, April 10, 1958

Modificato da Fidelio

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

cliff

 

Una mia curiosità .

 

Gli esemplari bimetallici , particolari tra i già particolari medaglioni , sono prodotti coevi ai personaggi che vi sono rappresentati , o potrebbero essere coevi tra di loro , tipo , ad esempio , i contorniati ?

 

Tutte le ipotesi finora convergono verso la prima possibilità, ossia sono coevi agli imperatori ivi rappresentati. Esistono difatti anche sesterzi bimetallici con valore corrente e segni di circolazione.

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

cliff

 

Ringrazio @@cliff per aver ricordato quali opere sono in corso per questo argomento, credo si possa aggiungere tra i piu recenti anche l'opera di Toynbee, Jocelyn M.C. 1944. Roman Medallions. New York; che ho appena individuato.

 

 

E' la prima che ho citato sopra... ;)

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

vickydog
Supporter

Se nell'epoca dei jet, pochi anni fa ci meravigliavamo delle 500 Lire bimetalliche (1982), pensate come dovevano essere impressionati i Romani di fronte a questi capolavori di arte e di tecnica. I Romani, ma anche i loro nemici!

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

VALTERI

@@cliff  post 16

"...esistono infatti anche sesterzi bimetallici con valore corrente e segni di circolazione "

 

La risposta ,  esauriente , ad una mia curiosità , mi solleva una seconda curiosità .

 

I sesterzi sono stati moneta corrente , dunque , in qualche misura e secondo il tempo  , normata .

 

Quali , oggi , le ipotesi su sesterzi ( ma anche dupondi : post 5 )  atipici , apparentemente casuali , quali i bimetallici ?

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

acraf

Per i medaglioni romani il testo piu' accessibile e ancora abbastanza aggiornato rimane il "Roman Medallions" di J.M.C. Toynbee,1944 (ma facilmente rintracciabile nella ristampa ANS del 1986); ha ancora qualche valenza piu' che altro come riferimento anche il vecchio Froenher "NUMISMATIQUE ANTIQUE. LES MÉDAILLONS DE L'EMPIRE ROMAIN DEPUIS LE RÈGNE D'AUGUSTE JUSQU'À PRISCUS ATTALE". Paris: J. Rothschild, 1878.

Anche i tre volumi dell'ottima opera omnia di Francesco Gnecchi, I medaglioni Romani, 1912, sono ancora un utile lavoro di riferimento con delle ottime tavole, soprattutto nell'edizione originale.

 

In realtà come sta succedendo da qualche anno a questa parte i lavori piu' avanzati ed aggiornati sulla materia sono ormai in tedesco, e nello specifico il lavoro di riferimento è ormai P.F.Mittag, "Romische Medaillon", Franz Steiner Verlag 2012. Questo è solo il primo volume di cui si attende il secondo ma sono stati introdotti nuovi concetti sulla sistemazione e sull'utilizzo dei medaglioni riordinandoli nel periodo pre-adrianeo e da Adriano in avanti. Una successiva sistemazione per diametro,peso e design è poi adottata.

 

Ho avuto notizia in realtà anche di un'altra interessante opera, in italiano, di Francesca Barenghi, "I medaglioni romani imperiali da Augusto al 284 d. C. : studio storico-tipologico, 1996", ma tale opera purtroppo sembra non sia facilmente consultabile in quanto credo sia una tesi di dottorato non pubblicata. Se qualcuno ne avesse notizia sarei interessato a consultarla.

 

La Barenghi adesso lavora nella ditta numismatica di Moruzzi. Quindi chi è seriamente interessato al suo studio, può telefonare alla ditta Moruzzi. Io non so se è uno studio disponibile.

  • Mi piace 1

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

Illyricum65

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

acraf

Ottimo articolo e belle foto. Di particolare interesse l'annotazione che finora mancava uno studio specifico sui medaglioni bimetallici. 

Nel caso specifico il tondello centrale è risultato essere di oricalco e il bordo esterno di rame. Molto accurato l'incastro tra i due elementi, che risulta essere stato effettuato a freddo. Un ennesimo dell'alto livello di tecnica monetaria nell'antica Roma....

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

Crea un account o accedi per lasciare un commento

Devi essere registrato per lasciare un commento

Crea un account

Iscriviti per un nuovo account nella nostra comunità. È facile!

Registra un nuovo account

Accedi

Sei già registrato? Accedi qui.

Accedi Ora

Accedi per seguire questo  

Lamoneta.it

La più grande comunità online di numismatica e monete. Studiosi, collezionisti e semplici appassionati si scambiano informazioni e consigli sul fantastico mondo della numismatica.

Hai bisogno di aiuto?

×