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King John

Le più belle rappresentazioni di guerrieri

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King John
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ΑVΤ Κ Π ΛΙΚ ΓΑΛΛΙΗΝΟC, Laureate draped cuirassed bust right  CΜΥΡΝΑΙΟΝ Γ Ν_ΕΟΚΟΡΟΝ[..] ΠΙ[...] ΦΙΛ[..] ΤΟΥ, The Amazon Smyrna, turreted and cuirassed, standing facing, head left, holding bipennis and pelta (shield) right. 

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IONIA, Smyrna. Autonomous issue. Time of Gordian III, circa 238-244 AD. Æ 30mm (14.48 gm). L. Ovinius Polites, magistrate.
Estimate $2000 
IONIA, Smyrna. Autonomous issue. Time of Gordian III, circa 238-244 AD. Æ 30mm (14.48 gm). L. Ovinius Polites, magistrate. EP C L OUINI POLEIT OU, veiled and draped bust of Demeter/Asia left, holding grain ears and cornucopiae / CMYPNAIWN PR ACIAC G NE TWN CE B, the Amazon Smyrna, as Tyche, standing left, turreted and clad in short chiton, holding patera, bipennis, and pelta; galley at feet. BMC Ionia pg. 265, 244; SNG Copenhagen -; cf. SNG von Aulock 2194 (different reverse legend); Imhoof-Blumer, Amazonen, 21 (pl. II, 3 - same reverse die). Good VF, dusty green patina. ($2000)
The Amazon tribe of warrior women provided the eponymous founders for a number of cities in Asia Minor, including Pitane, Kyme, Myrina and Smyrna. Many of these founders are seen on coins in the guise of a Tyche, or city goddess, with a walled or towered crown, and offering a sacrifice from a patera at the ceremonies marking the city's foundation. The founding of an overseas colony is also marked by the galley. In addition, the Amazons also display their traditional attributes, the short dress or chiton, usually with one breast bare, a double-axe and a small shield.
 

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King John
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Troas, Ilion Æ16. Circa 241-228 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right / Athena Ilias standing left, monogram and owl in front. Bellinger, Troy T 27; BMC 20. 3.52g, 16mm, 6h. Good Very Fine, earthy green patina.

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TROAS, Ilium. Valerian I. AD 253-260. Æ Medallion (41mm, 27.02 g, 12h). AV · K · Π · Λ · OV-AΛEPIANOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / ΙΛIEΩN EKT-ΩP, Hector, fully armored, advancing right, holding firebrand in raised right hand, large shield in left; two ships to lower right. Bellinger pl. 13, T292 = SNG München 278 = Mionnet II p. 667, 241 (same dies). Good VF, green patina, minor areas of roughness. Extremely rare and the only example in private hands.
From the Frank D. Arnold Collection.

Immagine: Achille su un francobollo greco.

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TROAS, Ilium. Caracalla. AD 198-217. Æ 32mm (24.07 g, 1h). Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / Hector standing right, holding a rock with which he prepares to wound Teucer, whom he holds by the hair, kneeling left with bow at feet; to right, Ajax running right with head left, brandishing shield and spear. Bellinger -; SNG Lewis 1333 (same dies). Fine, rough brown surfaces. Extremely rare; possibly only the third example known.
From the J.S. Wagner Collection.
The son of the Greek king Telamon of Salamis and his Trojan wife Hesione, Teucer was the half-brother of the Greek hero Ajax the Greater, as well as the nephew of King Priam of Troy and cousin of Hector. Siding with the Greeks and hiding behind the giant shield of his half-brother, Teucer used his skills as an archer to defend the Greeks against the Trojans. Enraged by Teucer's success during one of these fights, Hector picked up a huge rock and flung it at Teucer, injuring him so badly that he was forced to withdraw for some time while he recuperated from the concussion.
Estimate: 1000 USD

Immagine:  Duello tra Aiace ed Ettore; Aiace dopo il lancio delle aste tira un masso contro il principe troiano

Nel duello tra Ettore e Aiace iI primo assalto lo effettuò il troiano, ma l'avversario dotato di un famoso scudo bloccò l'attacco che non superò gli strati di pelle di cui era composto. Aiace sferrò un assalto con la sua forte lancia, oltrepassando lo scudo del troiano, ma Ettore fu abile ad abbassarsi appena in tempo per evitare una tragica fine. L'attacco del principe troiano di nuovo si infranse sullo scudo, e la sua arma all'urto si piegò. Il figlio di Priamo afferrò una pietra da terra deciso a continuare, sferrando quindi un colpo allo scudo che risuonò rimbombando. Aiace prese una pietra molto più grande della prima e la scagliò contro l'avversario: quel poco di scudo ancora rimasto venne distrutto definitivamente, il principe troiano venne tramortito e il suo corpo cadde al suolo. Subito l'eroe si riprese, estrasse la spada, lo stesso fece Aiace e i due si sarebbero uccisi a vicenda se gli araldi, fra cui Ideo, non si fossero opposti alla continuazione della sfida. e così, grazie alla decisione di Ettore, il duello ebbe fine, senza vinti o vincitori e si scambiarono doni di rispetto. 

 

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King John
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(s.II-I a.C.). Galia Massalia. Ae12. (S. falta) (Dela Tour 2053). Pátina verde. 2,18 g. EBC-.

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King John
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Il nostro congedo militare  era così...

 

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King John
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Quello dei Romani, invece, era così.

Gemini, LLC, Auction I dell'11/01/2005, lotto n.371

Bronze military diploma, dated March 7, AD 160 (height: 132 mm; width: 100 mm) with well-rendered, nearly complete exterior inscription, three-quarters of which is repeated in the less carefully engraved interior inscription. Two holes near center and at lower right corner for attachment to second plaque, now missing. Chipped at center of bottom edge and at upper right and lower left corners. An extremely rare and important diploma, naming units in the LevantTRIB POT XXIII IMP II COS IV PPEQVITIBVS ET PEDITIBVS QVI MILITAVERVNT IN ALIS TRIBVS QVAE APPELLANTVRGALLORVM ET THRACVM CONST ET ANTIA GVM ET COHORTIBVS DECEM ET DVABVS V GE MELLA ET I THRACVM _ ET I SEBASTENORVM_ ET I DAMASCENORVM ARMENIACVM SAG ET I MONTANORVM ET I FLAVIAE CR ET I ET II VLPIAE GALATARVM ET III ET IV CALLAECO RVM BRACARAVGVSTANOR ET IV ET VI VLPI AE PETREORVM ET SVNT IN SYRIA PA LAESTINA SVB MAXIMO LVCILIANO LEG QVINQVE ET VIGINTI STIPENDIS EMERI TIS DIMISSIS HONESTA MISSIONE QVO RVM NOMINA SVBSCRIPTA SVNT CIVITA TEM ROMANAM QVI EORVM NON HABERENT DEDIT ET CONVBIVM CVM VXORIBVS QVAS TVNC HABVISSENT CVM EST CIVITAS IS DA TA AVT CVM IS QVAS POSTEA DVXISSENT DVM TAXAT SINGVLIS NONIS MAR A PLATORIO NEPOTECOS M POSTVMIO FEST O COH I SEBASTENORVM I CVI PRAES CAVELLIVS MAXIMVSEXPEDITE VAXADE VAXADI F SVEDR DESCRIPT ET RECOGNIT EX TABVLA AERE QVAE FIX EST ROM IN MVRO POST TEMPL DIVI AVG AD MINERVAM EXTERIOR TEXT TRANSLATION The emperor Casesar T Aelius Hadrianus Augustus Pius, son of the deified Hadrian, grandson of the deified Trajan Parthicus, great grandson of the deified Nerva, Pontifex Maximus in the twenty-third year of his tribunician power, twice imperator, four times consul, father of his country grants Roman citizenship to the cavalrymen and infantrymen who do not already possess it, that served in the three alae which are called [1] Gallorum and Thracum Constantia and [2] Antiana Gallorum and Thracum Sagittariora and [3] VII Phrygum, and in the twelve cohorts called [1] V Gemella and [2] I Thracum (milliaria) and [3] I Sebastenorum (milliaria) and [4] I Damascenorum Armeniacum Sagittarioria and [5] I Montanorum and [6] I Flaviae civium Romanorum and [7] I and [8] II Ulpiae Galatarum and [9] III and [10] IV Callaecorum Bracaraugustanorum and [11] IV and [12] VI Ulpiae Petraeorum and are in Syria-Palestine under the governor Maximus Lucilianus, who have served twenty-five years and have been honorably discharged, whose names are written below, and conubium (legal marriage) with the wives they had when citizenship was given to them, or with those wives whom they later marry, but only one wife each. On the 7th of March when A. Platorius Nepos and M. Postumus Festus were (suffect) consuls. On behalf of the cohort I Sebastenorum (milliaria) under the command of Cavellius Maximus. To the ex-infantryman Vaxadus, son of Vaxadus of Syedra (in Cilicia). Copied and checked from the bronze tablet which is affixed in Rome upon the wall behind the temple of the deified Augustus near the shrine of Minerva. After serving twenty-five years in the Roman auxiliary units, a soldier was granted his Roman citizenship as well as the legalization of his existing or future marriage. A diploma, copied from an original posted in Rome, served as evidence of these civic rights and no doubt was preserved as an important legal document by its recipient and his descendants. Vaxadus, the Cilician recipient of the present diploma, served in three cavalry (alae) and twelve infantry (cohortes) units in his military career. All of these auxilia were based in Syria-Palestine, the name given to the former province of Judea upon the defeat of the Bar Kochba Revolt in 135. It is certainly conceivable that Vaxadus saw action in the waning years of the Bar Kochba uprising and in a subsequent Jewish revolt about which little is known during the reign of Antoninus. Generally, however, his period of service was marked by relative peace in the eastern provinces. The interior side of the plaque repeats the exterior text, but with less well-rendered characters. A second plaque, completing the interior text and listing the names of witnesses would have been bound to the first by a wire brad through the two central holes..
Estimate: $25000

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King John
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THESSALY, Trikka. 4th century BC. Æ Chalkous (14mm, 2.07 g, 9h). Head of nymph Trikke r. with hair rolled, wearing triple pendant earring / [TPIK] l. up, KAIO[N] r. down, warrior naked but for conical helmet, in fighting attitude r., holding spear in his r. and large shield with his l. See CNG 87 (18 May 2011) 428 (same obv. die). Near VF, dark green patina; die flaw in field on obv. in front of face.

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SCENE DA UN ASSEDIO

Moneyer issues of Imperatorial Rome. C. Numonius Vaala. 43 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.78 g, 3h). Rome mint. Bare head of Numonius Vaala right; C • NVMONIVS downwards to right, VAALA upwards to left / Soldier advancing left, holding spear and shield, attacking a vallum defended by two soldiers; VAALA in exergue. Crawford 514/2; CRI 322; Sydenham 1087; Kestner 3788; BMCRR Rome 4216; Numonia 2. VF, attractively toned. Well centered.
From the Archer M. Huntington Collection, ANS 1001.1.10525.
As with many of the moneyers' types of the late first century BC, C. Numonius Vaala's reverse type refers to an historic event in his family's past. We cannot know to which specific ancestor the moneyer is referring, but the scene depicts military action that brought a specific honor to the soldier involved. During the siege of a city or an enemy camp, the first soldier to breach the walls was awarded the corona vallaris , or "wall crown". The cognomen Vaala became a hereditary title among the Numonii, to be displayed proudly by the first member of the family to achieve the office of moneyer.

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MACEDON, Koinon. Time of Gordian III. AD 238-244. Æ 27mm (10.15 g). Diademed head of Alexander III right / KOINON M-AKEΔONΩN B NE-O, Alexander on horseback, galloping right. AMNG III 647 var.; BMC Macedonia pg. 24, 123 var.; SNG Copenhagen 1356 var. Fine, brown patina, even proosity.
From the Garth R. Drewry Collection.

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King John
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GAUL, Massalia. Circa 525/0-480/70 BC. AR Hemiobol (10mm, 0.76 g). Auriol Hoard type. Ionian helmet right / Incuse square. Auriol Group N, 23 (Av13/Rv–); SNG Copenhagen –. Good VF, toned, porous, edge splits. High relief. Rare. Ex Dix Noonan Webb A7 (17 March 2009), lot 1110.

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Judaea. Mattathias Antigonus. 40-37 AD. Prutah, 1.26g. (h). Obv: Mattatayah the High Priest around showbread table. Rx: BAΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΓΟΝΟΥ; seven-branched menorah. Hendin 1168. Beautifully centered. About EF.
Other than the first type of the Year One Shekel of the Jewish War, the Menorah coin of Antigonus Mattatias is the most significant and sought-after of all Jewish coins. At the time that this coin was minted the golden show-bread table was considered more relevant than the menorah, which is why it is on the obverse. Possibly because of its relationship to the Christian Mass and the body of Christ our modern perception has changed totally. Less than forty of these coins are recorded. While we hesitate to call anything the finest known, this specimen is marginally better than Bromberg and far better than the two Sheshona examples. A testament to its rarity is the fact that in fifty years this is the first example of this important coin that we have ever had the honor to offer .

 

Immagine: rilievo dell'arco di Tito con la Menorah sottratta al Tempio di Gerusalemme e portata in trionfo a Roma. La Menorah era una lampada ad olio a sette bracci in cui ardeva olio consacrato.

 

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Although the Saecular Games stretch back to the quasi-historical period of the early Roman Republic, they were held only sporadically for centuries until revived by the first Roman Emperor, Augustus (27 BC – AD 14), in 17 BC. The festivities were commemorated by the emperor on this rare silver denarius, struck during the year of the Games. On the obverse appears what is perhaps a portrait of the deified Julius Caesar, while the reverse features a herald of the Games, holding a caduceus and ornamented shield. The inscription, “AVGVST • DIVI • F • LVDOS • SAE,” directly references the Games.

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King John
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Denario di Domiziano sempre dedicato ai Giochi Secolari.

Diritto:  IMP CAESARDOMIT AUG GERMP M TR P VIII IMPXVIII (?), testa laureata a destra

Rovescio:  Una colonna con sopra scritto: COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC; un araldo avanza verso sinistra, con un copricapo piumato, in mano un bastone ed uno scudo.

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King John
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Ludi saeculares erano cerimonie complesse che comprendevano sacrifici e rappresentazioni sceniche; si tenevano alla fine di ogni saeculum, un periodo che equivaleva a 100 anni, ossia la massima durata di una vita umana. La preparazione delle cerimonie e il loro svolgimento erano registrate su un pilastro di bronzo e uno di marmo; dei pilastri marmorei restano numerosi frammenti qui ricomposti.

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The Roman Empire 
Aelia Verina, wife of Leo I 
Æ 2, Constantinopolis 468-473, Æ 4.93 g. AEL VER – INA AVG Pearl-diademed and draped bust r. Rev. SALVS REI – PVBLICAE Victory seated r., supporting on a low column a shield inscribed with Christogram, to which she points; in exergue, CONE. RIC 622. MIRB 25. LRC 598. 
Extremely rare. Dark tone and about very fine

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Carthago Nova. Time of Hannibal, c. 221-208 BC. AR Double Shekel (14.7g) struck c. 220 BC. Minted at Carthago Nova, ca. 220 BC. Laureate, bearded head left of Herakles-Melqart(?), the strongly Semitic features suggesting Hamilcar Barca (father of Hannibal), with heavy, knotted club over far shoulder. Reverse : Mahout wearing long cloak and cap(?), holding goad in right hand, and riding African elephant right. CNH 13 (same dies ); Gulbenkian 389 (same dies ); Robinson, Essays-Mattingly , 6a ( same dies ). Boldly struck in high relief and well centered. A powerful portrait of the finest style of the period. Probably the finest known specimen . Superb Extremely Fine. .

IMMAGINE: Annibale parla alle sue truppe.

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SICILY, AITNA, after 210 BC. AE18 Trias, Copenhagen 14v, Sear 1018. Radiate hd. Apollo r./Warrior stg. l. with spear and shield, three pellets in field to l. VF. Very rare. Provenance: The Thomas Virzi collection.
 

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Imperatorial Rome. Julius Caesar, d. 44 BC. AR (Silver) Denarius (4.09 g), Rome mint, struck January-February 44 BC. Laureate head of Caesar right, simpulum and lituus behind; CAESAR.IMP. Reverse: Venus stands left, head lowered, holding Victory and reversed spear, shield at side; M.METTIVS, G in left field. Crawford 480/3; CRI 100; Alföldi (Caesar in 44 v. Chr.) plate XXI, 128 (these dies). Remarkably well-centered for this series, on ample flan of superb metal. With bold, naturalistic lifetime portrait of the aging Caesar. Very handsome collection toning. A stunning coin, without the usual striking and other problems, rampant in this series, and rare as such. NGC graded Choice About Uncirculated. .
The portrait denarii of Julius Caesar are certainly the most studied in Imperatorial coinage. Lifetime portraits first appeared on Roman coins during this relatively brief time span between the Republic and the coinage of the emperors. By placing the denarii in die-link order, time frames have been better understood, identifying this exceptional denarius most probably struck during the second half of February 44 BC, just before the assassination of Julius Caesar on the fifteenth of March of that fateful year.
Estimated Value $12,000 - 14,000.

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OSTROGOTHS. Athalaric. 526-534 AD. Æ 10 Nummi (2.57 gm). Rome mint.
Estimate $300
OSTROGOTHS. Athalaric. 526-534 AD. Æ 10 Nummi (2.57 gm). Rome mint. Helmeted, draped, and cuirassed bust of Roma right / DN ATAL ARICVS, S C across field, Athalaric standing facing, head right, holding spear and shield; X (denomination) to left. Metlich 85a; MIB I 77; cf. MEC 1, 132. Good VF, brown and green patina. ($300)
From the Garth R. Drewry Collection.

@Poemenius vuoi darci qualche info su questa moneta?

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Poemenius

Con grande piacere….

La moneta che proponi, Metlich 85a, ritrae con ogni probabilità al retro proprio Atalarico, il re Goto citato nella legenda.

La moneta esiste anche in una variante (metlich 85b) che posto dal libro in questione.

 

La X in effetti rappresenta il valore = 10 nummi, da notare in questo caso invece l’anacronistica, ma affascinante, apposizione del SC, a richiamare un Senatus Consulto diciamo “improbabile” J …. Un richiamo al passato, ma sulla moneta è quasi certamente senza significato…

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King John
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Commodus AR Denarius, Adlocutio reverse
Commodus (180-192 AD). AR Denarius (17 mm, 3.48 g), Roma (Rome), 184-185 AD.
Obv. M COMM ANT AVG P BRIT FEL, laureate head right.
Rev. P M TR P X IMP VII COS IIII P P, Commodus standing left on platform, holding sceptre, right hand raised, addressing three soldiers standing right; below, FID EXERC.
RIC III, 110c.
Rare and interesting type. Good very fine.

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Q. Servilius Caepio (M. Junius) Brutus. 54 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.80 g, 3h). Rome mint. Head of Libertas right / The consul L. Junius Brutus walking left between two lictors preceded by an accensus. Crawford 433/1; Sydenham 906; Junia 31. Near EF, minor roughness. This issue alludes to the expulsion of Tarquinius Superbus, the last king of Rome, by L. Junius Brutus, the moneyer's ancestor, who in 509 BC was elected the first consul of the newly formed Republic.

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Nella tradizione cristiana il ritorno di Cristo nella gloria per giudicare i vivi e i morti è detta  parousìa che in greco significa “presenza”, “esser presenti”. Questo termine veniva usato per indicare la manifestazione di una divinità di solito nascosta che rende percepibile la sua presenza per mezzo di prodigi o la visita di un re o di un imperatore in una data regione o città (in latino adventus). Sul medaglione qui proposto è raffigurato l'adventus di Caracalla a Pergamo e sul bassorilievo un adventus di Marco Aurelio.

 

MYSIA, Pergamum. Caracalla. 198-217 AD. Æ Medallion - 43mm (43.91 gm). M. CaereliusAttalos, magistrate.
Estimate $3000 
MYSIA, Pergamum. Caracalla. 198-217 AD. Æ Medallion - 43mm (43.91 gm). M. CaereliusAttalos, magistrate.
AVT KPAT K MAPKOC AVP ANTWNEINOC, laureate and cuirassed (with gorgoneion) bust right / EPI CTR M KAIREL ATTALOU PERGAMHNWN PRWTWN G NEWKORWN, adventus of the emperor into Pergamum: Caracalla on horseback right, receiving acclamation, soldier walking behind, statue of Asclepius on garlanded column before. BMC Mysia pg.154, 321; SNG Copenhagen -; cf. SNG von Aulock 1414 (smaller flan); Mionnet II 631. VF, dark green patina with red highlights, fields smoothed. ($3000)
In the fall of 214 AD, Caracalla visited the shrine of Asclepius at Pergamum ostensibly to seek the god's help in curing his various diseases that he had succumbed to while in Germany (probably physiological more so than psychological). Caracalla must have received some respite from his illnesses as he then ordered the reconstruction of the temple of Asclepius as well as the temples of Roma, the deified Augustus, Zeus Philus and the deified Trajan. Of course, these acts would have endeared Caracalla to the Pergamenes who then struck a special series of medallions commemorating this historic visit. (For further reading about Caracalla's visit, see K. Harl,Civic Coins and Civic Politics In the Roman East A.D. 180-275, pp. 55-58.)

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