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apollonia

GC Le monete più attraenti di Alessandro Magno

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Tetradramma Svoronos 256 (Triton XVI).

1499680260_TetradrammaTolomeoISvoronos256TritonXVI92000589.jpg.a74b0270fafe128c5b22e11131264407.jpg

PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy I Soter. 305-282 BC. AR Tetradrachm (27mm, 14.24 g, 1h). Alexandreia mint. Struck circa 300-285 BC. Diademed head right, wearing aegis around neck, small Δ behind ear / BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΠTOΛEMAIOY, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; to left, P above ΠA monogram. Svoronos 256; SNG Copenhagen –; Noeske 29; Meydancikkale 3234–91 (cf. 3293 for same obv. die on different issue). EF, toned, scattered tiny deposits. Well centered on a broad flan of excellent metal.
The monogram on this coin appears to have been recut in the die over another control mark.

625481757_Giovenalefirmaconingleseetedescook.jpg.50169854dc499397ed366a7170120db0.jpg

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Tetradramma Svoronos 256 var., possibile imitazione contemporanea per lo stile (CNG EA 394).

1070564991_TetradrammaTolomeo256var.CNGimage00305.jpg.ee036683a6fb20f0b1de0c34d6440061.jpg

PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy I Soter. 305-282 BC. AR Tetradrachm (25.5mm, 14.03 g, 1h). Alexandreia mint. Struck circa 300-285 BC. Diademed head right, wearing aegis / Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; to left, P above monogram. Svoronos 256 var. (small Δ behind ear); SNG Copenhagen –; Noeske 29 var. (same). VF, some roughness, die breaks on obverse, reverse struck with clashed die.

This piece is of a somewhat irregular style, and lack the small Δ behind Ptolemy's ear, so it is possibly a contemporary imitation.

909327107_Giovenalefirmaconingleseetedescook.jpg.f4f4f57ef7b97a5fc84282583f1c0df7.jpg

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Altro esemplare 256 var. in VCoins

https://www.vcoins.com/it/stores/zurqieh/171/product/egypt_ptolemaic_kings_ptolemy_i_soter_305282_bc_ar_tetradrachm_255mm_1403_g_1h_alexandria_mint_struck_c_300285_bc/879576/Default.aspx

55907593_TetradrammaTolomeo256var.esemplareVCoins.jpg.29194998e52dfbb8ae57e620a91f3f2a.jpg

Egypt. Ptolemaic kings. Ptolemy I Soter. 305-282 BC. AR tetradrachm (25.5mm, 14.03 g, 1h). Alexandria mint. Struck c. 300-285 BC. Diademed head r., wearing aegis / Eagle standing l. on thunderbolt; to l., P above monogram. Svoronos 256 var; Noeske 29 var. Probably a contemporary imitation.

1171771157_Giovenalefirmaconingleseetedescook.jpg.97cd170f036b56b02df3d006be606564.jpg

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Tetradramma Svoronos 257 (CNG EA 439).

882747124_TetradrammaTolomeo257CNG4390168.jpg.9b3889aad33795c9bbb28e3a535fe463.jpg

Greek 
PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy I Soter. 305-282 BC. AR Tetradrachm (26mm, 13.68 g, 1h). Alexandreia mint. Struck 294-282 BC. Diademed head right, wearing aegis / Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; to left, P above
ΔM monogram. CPE 173; Svoronos 257; SNG Copenhagen –. Good VF, toned, edge chipped, numerous bankers' marks.
Ex Numismatik Naumann 49 (8 January 2017), lot 328.

1939664666_Giovenalefirmaconingleseetedescook.jpg.422c61ded9105ba6cb464c4a905f75d2.jpg

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Altro esemplare 257 (CNG EA 271).

204025066_TetradrammaTolomeo257CNGaltroesemplare2710303.jpg.6e44f49129dffd6b5bfc492050285028.jpg

PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy I Soter. 305-282 BC. AR Tetradrachm (28mm, 14.26 g, 1h). Alexandreia mint. Struck circa 300-285 BC. Diademed bust of Ptolemy I, wearing [aegis] / Eagle with closed wings standing left on thunderbolt; to left, P above monogram. Svoronos 257; SNG Copenhagen -. Near EF, obverse die break before bust, hairline flan crack, graffito on reverse. 

CNG 271, Lot: 303. Estimate $1000. Sold for $950. 

1077155724_Giovenalefirmaconingleseetedescook.jpg.13826a06f431ff8c7795f15b252b7207.jpg

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Tetradramma Svoronos 259 (NAC 59).

1590578231_TetradrammaTolomeo259NAC41024l.jpg.8cd1031685734db470e6bd6616121f46.jpg

Greek Coins
The Ptolemys Kings of Egypt, Ptolemy I Soter, circa 306 – 283
Tetradrachm, Alexandria circa 306-283, AR 14.08 g. Diademed head r., wearing aegis knotted around neck.
Rev. PTOLEMAIOU - BASILEWS Eagle, with closed wings, standing l. on thunderbolt; in l. field, P / monogram. SNG Copenhagen 72. Svoronos 259 and pl. IX, 13.
Extremely fine.

Estimate: 1'500 CHF   |   Starting price: 1'200 CHF  Price realized: 2'600 CHF

1740690417_Giovenalefirmaconingleseetedescook.jpg.68dbad28f7fafbfe2914a55cfadf1ad5.jpg

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Altro esemplare 259 (CNG EA 389).

312028602_TeradrammaTolomeo259CNGaltroesemplare3890378.jpg.3ac475cb3db7497b44acf09dd45f25f3.jpg

PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy I Soter. 305-282 BC. AR Tetradrachm (27.5mm, 14.06 g, 1h). Alexandreia mint. Struck circa 300-282 BC. Diademed head right, wearing aegis around neck / Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; to left, P above monogram. Svoronos 259; SNG Copenhagen 72. VF, toned, banker’s mark and scuff on obverse, graffiti on reverse. From Group SGF.

1490269434_Giovenalefirmaconingleseetedescook.jpg.ae9d15cf842f64ce7444e475c056e333.jpg

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Tetradramma Svoronos 261 (Numismatik Naumann 57).

3273861l.thumb.jpg.ab9f3fd6620f6367893b8b9305e8bc7c.jpg

Greek Coins
PTOLEMAIC KINGS OF EGYPT.
Ptolemy I Soter (305-282 BC). Tetradrachm. Alexandreia.
Obv: Diademed head right, wearing aegis; small
Δ behind ear.
Rev:
ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; to left, P above monogram.
Svoronos 261.
Condition: Very fine, some bankers' marks on the obverse, graffiti on the reverse.

Weight: 13.86 g.
Diameter: 25 mm.

111186244_Giovenalefirmaconingleseetedescook.jpg.88af22dcebb77586b7da1b1d01a313d4.jpg

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Tetradramma Svoronos 263 (CNG EA 274).

1593383100_TetraTolomeo2632740197.jpg.d984d385303921a71ff4d8d08a31bb45.jpg

PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy I Soter. 305-282 BC. AR Tetradrachm (28mm, 14.46 g, 12h). Alexandreia mint. Struck circa 300-285 BC. Diademed head right, wearing aegis around neck; small Δ behind ear / Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; to left, P above Φ. Svoronos 263; SNG Copenhagen -. Good VF, scratches and graffiti (zig-zag pattern before bust) under attractive tone, obverse banker’s mark. 

1743356711_Giovenalefirmaconingleseetedescook.jpg.2e4b8ff78e971280ee2e29c394904764.jpg

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Tetradramma Svoronos 265 (CNG EA 396).

628595210_TetradrammaTolomeoSV.265CNG3960252.jpg.955d28c48a24554cb817f1dd8390f019.jpg

PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy I Soter. 305-282 BC. AR Tetradrachm (28mm, 13.93 g, 12h). Alexandreia mint. Struck circa 300-285 BC. Diademed head right, wearing aegis around neck, small Δ behind ear / Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; to left, P above monogram. Svoronos 265; SNG Copenhagen 73. Fine, bankers' marks and scratches.
From the W. H. Guertin Collection.

566540854_Giovenalefirmaconingleseetedescook.jpg.3dcced9629c9b2e692824ff3f63ccc57.jpg

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Altro esemplare 265 (CNG 85).

563442077_TetradrammaTolomeoSv.265secondoesemplareCNG85000534.jpg.1b2815c589991c9fc6289b1044b5fc2f.jpg

PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy I Soter. 305-282 BC. AR Tetradrachm (26mm, 14.30 g, 1h). Alexandreia mint. Struck circa 298/4-290/85 BC. Diademed head right, wearing aegis around neck, small Δ behind ear / Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; to left, P above . Svoronos 265; SNG Copenhagen 73. Good VF, toned, graffiti in fields on reverse.
Ex Sotheby’s (6 November 1997), lot 149.

1258981890_Giovenalefirmaconingleseetedescook.jpg.899e32840c688c6cc75800fdcaaaa74a.jpg

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Decadramma di Alessandro Magno (Goldberg 106).

892777315_DecadrammaAle1.thumb.JPG.1b1a7e6eba4002e52c58d894124f8bf8.JPG

Macedonian Kingdom. Alexander III 'the Great'. Silver Tetradrachm (17.09 g), 336-323 BC. Babylon, lifetime, ca. 325-323 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin headdress. Reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞANΔPOY, Zeus seated left, holding eagle and scepter; in left field, thunderbolt above M; below throne, monogram. Price 3680; cf. Kraay-Hirmer pl. 173 (decadrachm of the same style). Amongst the finst known tetradrachms of Alexander the Great, and by the same hand that made Alexander's famous decadrachms. A life-time iss of superb artistic merit. Some trace of silver oxide remain on the reverse. A fabulous example. Mint State. Estimate Value $2,000 - UP 

1643411406_Giovenalefirmaconingleseetedescook.jpg.269a6a08f6f9a5def9c56141217db49f.jpg

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Decadramma di Alessandro Magno (Heritage 3061).

1326013286_DecadrammaAle2.thumb.JPG.7de74e1808b160b71fc48ae59bdc3d1d.JPG

MACEDONIAN KINGDOM. Alexander III the Great (336-323 BC). AR decadrachm (35mm, 39.61 gm, 10h). NGC XF 5/5 - 2/5, Fine Style. Ecbatana or Babylon, 325-323 BC. Head of Heracles right, wearing lion skin headdress, the forepaws knotted below chin / A?E?AN?POY, Zeus enthroned left on throne with high back, himation draped around waist and legs, holding eagle in outstretched right hand and vertical dotted scepter in left, bee in left field; below throne, monogram in form of trident-head with superimposed ?, M below. Price 3618A. HGC 3.1, 909. Müller --. Mnemata: Papers in Memory of Nancy M. Waggoner (1989), p. 69, 8 and pl. 15. Extremely rare, one of four recorded specimens with the bee mintmark. Areas of corrosion and porosity, obverse delamination, still a truly monumental piece, struck in high relief on an immense flan. Alexander's conquests "liberated" tons of gold and silver that had been locked away for centuries in the Great King's treasuries in Sardes, Susa, Persepolis and Babylon. Mint masters soon set to work turning this huge haul into coins, which were paid out to Alexander's soldiers and high officials in staggering quantities. However, the silver decadrachm denomination, worth 10 Attic drachms and 2.5 tetradrachms, was struck in limited numbers, indicating they were presentation pieces intended for only the top tier of Macedonian officers.  Only three decadrachm reverse varieties are known. Their extreme rarity -- today perhaps 25-30 examples are known to have survived -- makes it highly likely that these pieces were handed out by Alexander himself at a special ceremony, perhaps the one recorded at Susa in 324 BC where the great conqueror assembled his army and distributed up to 20,000 talents to his Macedonian veterans. The bidder on this piece thus has an opportunity to acquire a coin that, with a high degree of likelihood, could have passed through the hands of Alexander the Great.

HID05401242017

10614154_Giovenalefirmaconingleseetedescook.jpg.c63ecb346d1a5a2f1393b4c328c7c0db.jpg

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Decadramma di Alessandro Magno (Heritage 3064).

1356364501_DecadrammaAle3.thumb.JPG.6a2ea289f7e39bd4d1160d899afc8306.JPG

MACEDONIAN KINGDOM. Alexander III the Great (336-323 BC). AR decadrachm (32mm, 36.87 gm, 12h). NGC VF 5/5 - 1/5. Babylon (or possibly Susa or Ecbatana), ca. 325-323 BC. Head of Heracles right, wearing lion skin headdress, the forepaws knotted below chin / A?E?AN?POY, Zeus enthroned left on throne with high back and eagle-tipped finials, himation draped around waist and legs, left leg drawn back, feet on stool, holding eagle in outstretched right hand and vertical dotted scepter in left; M in left field, monogram in form of trident-head with superimposed ? below strut, dotted border. Price -, cf. 3600 (decadrachm, M in exergue), cf. Price 3603 (tetradrachm, same arrangement of controls). Although the M control mark is not visible on this example, stylistically it best matches the decadrachm with M in left field sold in Roma Numismatics, Ltd., Auction XIV, 21 September 2017, Lot 111 (hammer 100,000 GBP), as opposed to the examples plated in Price. Very rare and historically significant! The son of the brutal but capable King Philip II of Macedon, Alexander came to the throne upon his father\'s assassination in 336 BC and immediately launched into a career of conquest that took him to the very ends of the known world. Using the invincible army his father had assembled and trained, Alexander attacked the gigantic Persian Empire and defeated its king, Darius II, in three titanic battles between 335 and 332 BC. Unsatisfied with simply plundering the Persian realm and returning to Macedon, Alexander spent the next eight years driving his army steadily eastward, into the deserts of Arabia, the rugged mountains of Afghanistan, and the jungles of India, founding new cities in his wake. A true visionary, he sought a fusion of cultures and peoples, exhorting his soldiers to take wives from the local native populations and adopt Persian and Indian modes of dress. Alexander\'s conquests \"liberated\" tons of gold and silver that had been locked away for centuries in the Great King\'s treasuries in Sardes, Susa, Persepolis and Babylon. Mint masters soon set to work turning this huge haul into coins, which were paid out to Alexander\'s soldiers and high officials in staggering quantities. However, the silver decadrachm denomination, worth 10 Attic drachms and 2.5 tetradrachms, was struck in limited numbers, indicating they were presentation pieces intended for only the top tier of Macedonian officers. Their extreme rarity today makes it highly likely that these pieces were handed out by Alexander himself at a special ceremony, perhaps the one recorded at Susa in 324 BC where the great conqueror assembled his army and distributed up to 20,000 talents to his Macedonian veterans. The bidder on this piece thus has an opportunity to acquire a coin that, with a high degree of likelihood, could have passed through the hands of Alexander the Great.HID05401242017

1109770245_Giovenalefirmaconingleseetedescook.jpg.e50617cf46dc3865f43d7069ee1b30d0.jpg

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Decadramma di Poro (Heritage Chicago #3073)

2049965864_DecadrammaAle4.thumb.JPG.2e98e505dbfc747250344a156393f62a.JPG

MACEDONIAN KINGDOM. Alexander III the Great (336-323 BC). AR \'medallion\' of 5 shekels or decadrachm (35mm, 38.20 gm, 12h). NGC Fine 4/5 - 1/5. Local (Satrapal) mint in Babylon, ca. 327 BC or 325-323 BC. Alexander, wearing military attire and holding couched xyston in right hand, riding Bucephalus rearing right, attacking toward an elephant retreating right, upon which sits a helmeted mahout, goad and spear in left hand, turning around to throw another spear held aloft in his right hand; another helmeted figure behind him, also turning around, his right hand holding the tip of Alexander\'s xyston, ? above / Alexander standing facing, helmeted head left, wearing military attire, sword on hip, thunderbolt in extended right hand, grounded spear in left to right; Nike flying right above and crowning him with wreath held in both hands, monogram to left. Price pp. 4523 and pl. CLIX, GH. F. Holt, Alexander the Great and the Mystery of the Elephant Medallions (Berkeley, 2003), Appendix A, E/A 10 = M.J. Price, \"Circulation at Babylon in 323 B.C.\" in Mnemata: Papers in Memory of Nancy M. Waggoner (New York, 1991), 13 = M.J. Price, \"The \'Porus\' Coinage of Alexander the Great: a Symbol of Concord and Community\" in SPNO = MIG type 21, c. Extremely rare, one of about ten examples known, five of which are in museums (ANS, BM [2], BN, and Copenhagen). Includes a silver matrix of a perfectly preserved incuse of the entire reverse - likely either a layer of the actual coin which has separated from the flan, or a composite of the surrounding material which formed against the coin in situ. The obverse of the coin has traditionally been identified as commemorating Alexander the Great\'s defeat of King Poros at the battle of the Hydaspes in 326 BC, however, research by Price has strengthened the argument that the decadrachms were struck during the period of Alexander\'s campaigns in India. The degree of wear seen on the decadrachms, considering the Babylon 1973 Hoard was probably buried at the end of Alexander\'s lifetime, suggests that they might have been issued before the final defeat of King Poros by Alexander, although there is still debate as to exactly when these were produced. As the series was struck at the \'local\' mint in Babylon, which was producing the lion staters and struggled with quality production and weight consistency, most likely this exceptional, and very limited issue, was struck for members of the local population, rather than Macedonians or Greeks. At the time of the battle at the Hydaspes, a large contingent of troops in Alexander\'s army was raised from the local eastern satrapies. Unlike the Macedonians and Greeks, the victory over King Poros would have been the most important event in which they had participated, and as such, the event commemorated on the coins and the regalia of the figures on the coins point to the recipients being local, probably Iranian, leaders who had served under Alexander.HID05401242017

1384689047_Giovenalefirmaconingleseetedescook.jpg.cbdfce429bf9a27fa3611e465e3a7201.jpg

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Decadramma di Alessandro Magno (Heritage #3044)

645033451_DecadrammaAle5.JPG.45d57d783d1674de57f29d8ee4ea8b58.JPG

MACEDONIAN KINGDOM. Alexander III the Great (336-323 BC). AR decadrachm (35mm, 41.22 gm, 1h). Ecbatana or Babylon, 325-323 BC. Head of Heracles right, wearing lion skin headdress, the forepaws knotted below chin / A?E?AN?POY, Zeus enthroned left on throne with high back, hemation draped around waist and legs, holding eagle in outstretched right hand and vertical dotted scepter in left, below throne, monogram in form of trident-head with superimposed ?, M below, dotted border. Price 3598. Müller 669. Extremely rare and historically significant! Some areas of corrosion, a few surface nicks, still a truly monumental piece, struck from dies of remarkable style on a broad, weighty flan in sculptural high relief, and pleasantly toned. NGC (photo certificate) Choice XF 5/5 - 2/5, Fine Style. From a Private Family Collection, purchased ca. 1960. This coin has been issued a photo-certificate by NGC. It may be sent in for encapsulation after the auction at the request of the buyer, free of charge. Please contact Sam Spiegel at SamS@ha.com if you would like to utilize this option. The son of the brutal but capable King Philip II of Macedon, Alexander came to the throne upon his father's assassination in 336 BC and immediately launched into a career of conquest that took him to the very ends of the known world. Using the invincible army his father had assembled and trained, Alexander attacked the gigantic Persian Empire and defeated its king, Darius II, in three titanic battles between 335 and 332 BC. Unsatisfied with simply plundering the Persian realm and returning to Macedon, Alexander spent the next eight years driving his army steadily eastward, into the deserts of Arabia, the rugged mountains of Afghanistan, and the jungles of India, founding new cities in his wake. A true visionary, he sought a fusion of cultures and peoples, exhorting his soldiers to take wives from the local native populations and adopt Persian and Indian modes of dress. Alexander's conquests "liberated" tons of gold and silver that had been locked away for centuries in the Great King's treasuries in Sardes, Susa, Persepolis and Babylon. Mint masters soon set to work turning this huge haul into coins, which were paid out to Alexander's soldiers and high officials in staggering quantities. However, the silver decadrachm denomination, worth 10 Attic drachms and 2.5 tetradrachms, was struck in limited numbers, indicating they were presentation pieces intended for only the top tier of Macedonian officers. Their extreme rarity today -- fewer than 20 are known to exist -- makes it highly likely that these pieces were handed out by Alexander himself at a special ceremony, perhaps the one recorded at Susa in 324 BC where the great conqueror assembled his army and distributed up to 20,000 talents to his Macedonian veterans. The bidder on this piece thus has an opportunity to acquire a coin that, with a high degree of likelihood, could have passed through the hands of Alexander the Great.

Data asta: 03.01.2016, valutazione: 200’000 USD

886246689_Giovenalefirmaconingleseetedescook.jpg.e6af48f862447d9bde7633b94702996f.jpg

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Decadramma di Alessandro Magno (Heritage #3048).

1390393384_DecadrammaAle5bis.JPG.5471da8ec379c6f6bb084e347033ce80.JPG

È la moneta dell’asta precedente in data 03.01.2016, in cui era stata valutata 200’000 USD e rimasta invenduta. In quest’asta dell’11.08.2016 la valutazione è scesa a 80’000 USD e la moneta è stata aggiudicata a 75’000 USD.

688229769_Giovenalefirmaconingleseetedescook.jpg.389f1b38706f7ede054b907936d7adb4.jpg

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Decadramma di Alessandro Magno (Bertolami 8).

1924422503_DecadrammaAle6.JPG.a5209a0394e6b3551619b212ab34ac95.JPG

Kings of Macedonia, Alexander III, 336-323 and posthumous issues, Decadrachm, Babylon, c. 325-323 BC, AR (g 41,98"; mm 36; h 9), Head of Herakles r., wearing leonté; dotted border. Rv. A?E?AN?POY, Zeus seated l. on a throne with backrest ending with perched eagles, holding eagle and sceptre; below the throne, monogram over M, dotted border.Price 3600; Mitchiner 1975, 1b;". Müller -.Of the highest rarity with unpublished dies, struck in high relief and finest specimen known with an attractive old cabinet tone. Good extremely fine / Extremely fine. Privately purchased from Spink & Son, London.Until now only seven decadrachms of Alexander III have been recorded: one in Berlin (= Kraay-Hirmer 572), another in the British Museum (= Price 3598) and at least five from the Near Babylon Hoard (= Coin Hoards 1975, p. 14, 38, of which one example appeared in Leu sale 13, 1975, lot 129, our example, purchased from Spink and another in the NAC sale 72, 2013, 344). All these coins must have been issued in c. 325-323 BC together with numerous staters and tetradrachmae at Ekbatana, to which in 331 the bulk of the treasure of 180,000 talents (= 1,080 million drachmae) had been brought from Persepolis, Susa and Pasagardae. The most comprehensive review of these issues was made by Michael Mitchiner (M. Mitchiner 1975, The Early Indo- Greek Coins and their Antecedents I, London), Martin Jesop Price (M. J. Price 1989, Circulation at Babylon in 323 BC, in Mnemata : Papers in Memory of Nancy M. Waggoner) and later in the monumental work of 1991 (M. J. Price 1991, The Coinage in the name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus, London). Despite the studies on the Macedonian coinage, doubts remain about the place of production of these rare speci- mens. The most convincing and accepted hypothesis is proposed by Martin Price, who argues that the decadrachms were coined at Ekbatana for of Babylon, a theory supported by the presence of the same symbols on Alexanders deacadrachms and on staters issued b Mazaeus, satrap of Babylon in 331 BC. Overall, the decadrachms main- tain the same iconography adopted in silver coinage: on obverse there is the head of Herakles covered with the skin of the Nemean lion (the leonté), iconographic attribute given to the hero after f inishing his f irst effort. The reverse depicts Zeus seated on a throne and holding the sceptre and eagle, his totemic animal. Of all the Alexander IIIs coinage, the decadrachms definitely reach the highest artistic quality as can be seen in the reliefs of the face and in the anatomical details or in the throne, these elements are much more pronounced and defined than those found on tetradrachms or fractions.

Hammer 325’000 EUR nel 2014, più del doppio della stima di 150’000 EUR

8578048_Giovenalefirmaconingleseetedescook.jpg.19003195eb73f066ce4aa5c7c599720f.jpg

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Decadramma di Poro (The New York Sale XXVII).

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The Prospero Collection of Ancient Greek Coins. KINGDOM OF MACEDON. Alexander III, The Great (336-323 B.C.), Silver Dekadrachm of 5 Shekels, 40.08g,. Minted at Babylon, struck c.327 B.C. Alexander The Great on Bucephalus right, thrusting his sarissa at a mahout and his master seated on an Indian elephant to right; the mahout and master look back towards Alexander, the master grasps the end of Alexanders sarissa with his right hand, the mohout brandishes a sp ear in his right hand above his head while holding two further spears in his left hand, ? abo ve. Rev. Alexan der standing to left, wearing military attire, holding a thunderbolt in his right hand and a sarissa in his left, Nike flies above to right to crown him, monogram of AB in lower left field (M. Price, Circulation at Babylon in 323 B.C., Mnemata: Papers in Memory of Nancy M. Waggoner, p. 70, 12, pl. 15 (this coin); Price, The Poros coinage of Alexander the Great, a symbol of concord and community, Studia Paolo Naster Oblata, pp. 75-6, A/c; Mitchiner Type 21; BMC 61, pl. XXII, 18; Dürr, Neues aus Babylonien, SM 94 (May 1974), p. 36, 1). Only ten Poros Decadrachms are recorded, good very fine for issue and one of the fin est in existence, extremely rare, a coin of great historical fascination and of the highest importance .This coin published in Circulation at Babylon in 323 B.C., M. Price, Mnemata: Papers in Memory of Nancy M. Waggoner (1989), p. 70, 12, illustrated on pl. 15. Purchased from Spink & Son Ltd., London, 15 July 1989 This extremely rare coin is without doubt one of the most historically important ever produced. The first known example was published in 1887 (NC 1887, pp. 177-181) and, in 1973, a new hoard was found in Babylon (Coin Hoards I, 1975, 38), which increased the published examples from three to seven. It was this hoard that assisted with the dating of the issue to the lifetime of Alexander the Great. The above example, probably from the same hoard, surfaced in 1989. Following Alexanders victories over the Persian Empire, he continued to campaign further East towards India. As his army advanced through modern day Pakistan, it became necessary to deal with the Indian King Poros, ruler of the Pauravas, who had refused to acknowledge Alexanders increasing dominance. Alexander had to ensure that there would be no danger to the flanks of his army. King Poros positioned himself on the banks of the Hydaspes River, which he saw as a good defensive location as the river was at that time swollen due to monsoon rains. However, Alexander risked the crossing and, having reached the opposing bank, trapped the forces of Poros in a pincer movement. Alexanders victory at this battle resulted in the annexation of the Punjab into his empire, later leading to the formation of the Indo-Greek Kingdom. Two new cities, Bucephala and Nicaea, were founded by Alexander and it is in the context of this campaign that the Poros dekadrachms were issued. The deficiencies in striking make it clear that the dekadrachms were a local issue (see also lot 305 for a corresponding Tetradrachm), struck in Babylon. The obverse of the coin has traditionally been identified as commemorating Alexander the Greats defeat of King Poros at the battle of the Hydaspes in 326 B.C. However, research by Price has strengthened the argument that the dekadrachms were struck during the period of Alexanders campaigns in India. The degree of wear seen on the dekadrachms, when it is considered that the Babylon hoard was probably buried at the end of Alexanders lifetime, suggest that they might have been issued before the final defeat of King Poros by Alexander. Given that an issue of dekadrachms of this nature in Babylon is entirely exceptional, there has been some debate regarding how they were struck. It has been suggested that the Poros dekadrachms were overstruck, perhaps on the dekadrachms from Alexanders regular royal coinage (see lot 307 for an example). However, it must be said that the fabric is noticeably different and the types of the Poros dekadrachms, being a great deal shallower than those on the regular dekadrachms, could not have completely overstruck the original types. In addition to this, the edges of the Poros dekadrachms are straight rather than rounded; it seems far more likely that original flans were employed in their production. The reason for the issue of the dekadrachms is still not entirely clear. The types depict the campaigns of Alexander the Great in India and are therefore symbolic of historical events, but it cannot be said with certainty that the obverse shows an actual historical scene. Alexander is depicted in action, thrusting his sarissa toward the enemy seated above on the back of an elephant, the animal being symbolic of the military power of the opponent. The reverse of the coin displays Alexander as a military hero, with Nike preparing to crown him, perhaps suggestive of the inevitable victory that would transpire. The types of this dekadrachm have a commemorative purpose, and there have been suggestions that they might have been intended as presentation pieces for certain members of Alexanders army, but due to the fact that an issue of tetradrachms is linked to the dekadrachms, this remains uncertain. US$ 150,000

 

Hammer 300’000 EUR nel 2012, esattamente il doppio della stima.

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Decadramma di Poro (Gemini, LLC, Auction II).

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BABLYONIA. Alexander III, the Great. (336-323 BC). Silver decadrachm or 5 shekels (38.84 gm). , Taxla Mint, c. 327 BC. Alexander on Bucephalus right, lancing at a mahout and his master on Indian elephant right, both of whom look backward, the master grasping the end of Alexander's sarissa with his right hand, the mahout brandishing spear in raised right hand and holding two spares in left, Ξ in field above / Alexander standing left in military attire, holding thunderbolt in right hand and sarissa in left; to upper left, Nike flying right to crown him; AB monogram to lower left. Price, "Circulation at Babylon in 323 B.C.," Mnemata: Papers in Memory of Nancy M. Waggoner, p. 71, 13 (this coin). Price, "The Poros coinage of Alexander the Great, a symbol of concord and community," Studia Paolo Naster Oblata, p. 76, B/d (this coin). Mitchiner 21c (this coin, attributed to Taxila). Durr, SM 94 (May 1974), p. 36, 1. F.L. Holt, Alexander the Great and the Mystery of the Elephant Medallions, Appendix A, E/A10 (this coin).. Only ten Poros decadrachms recorded. A unique opportunity to obtain one of the rarest and most historically significant coins ever issued. Very fine. Ex Nelson Bunker Hunt Collection (Sotheby's, New York, 19-20 June 1991, lot 229); ex NFA V, 23-24 February 1978, lot 81; ex Leu 13, 29 April 1975, lot 130. This decadrachm and the two tetradrachms following represent special issues of the local Babylonian coinage, which normally took the form of lion staters. The obverse type of the tetradrachm was traditionally interpreted as commemorating Alexander's defeat of the Indian king Poros at the battle of the Hydaspes. Pointing out that Alexander treated Poros with honor after the battle, Price argued that that he was unlikely to have denigrated his new ally on his coinage. The tetradrachms portray the Indian elephant and long bow, well attested elements of Poros' army, but again Price argued that both weapons were ineffective in the battle of the Hydaspes. Price concluded that the coins were issued in the course of Alexander's Indian campaigns, not afterward; that the tetradrachms portray Indian auxiliaries who accompanied Alexander after his alliance with Taxiles; and that the obverse of the decadrachm very likely portrays the defeat of Poros while he was still Alexander's enemy. Price emphasized that these coins could serve as symbols of Alexander's policy of "concord and community" vis-a-vis the conquered peoples of the east. This interpretation does not adequately explain why such propaganda should have employed Indian themes to impress a Babylonian or Elymaean audience, nor does it account for the production of the decadrachm, an unprecedented coin denomination in the region, and one that was almost always a presentation piece. It seems less strained to view these coins as part of the victory donative paid out to the army upon Alexander's return to Babylon, in this case to native auxiliaries. Price claimed that the specimens in the Iraq, 1973 hoard were too worn to have been struck in 325, but the typical poor striking of these coins makes it difficult to assess actual wear. A thorough review and critique of earlier scholarship is available in Holt's Alexander the Great and the Mystery of the Elephant Medallions. Holt offers an exhaustive analysis of the iconography of these issues; especially illuminating is his perception that the reverse type of the decadrachms, showing Alexander holding a thunderbolt, gives him credit for the monsoon that aided his army in the battle against Poros. Holt identifies the elephant decadrachms and tetradrachms as aristeia, awards for meritorious service on the battlefield. Like Price, he argues that these coins must have been produced in the course of Alexander's campaign (though after rather than before the battle of the Hydaspes); the poor striking technique and lack of metrological control are offered as evidence for their issue by a temporary or Indian mint. These deficiencies are also consistent with an origin at the satrapal workshop of Babylon. Founded by Mazaeus, this facility was distinct from Alexander's royal mint and specialized in the production of lion staters during Alexander's lifetime, see H. Nicolet-Pierre, "Argent et or frappes en Babylonie entre 331 et 311 ou de Mazdai a Seleucos," Travaux Le Rider, pp. 285-286. The lion staters of this workshop are often poorly struck and notoriously irregular in weight. Striking coins the size of decadrachms would have been a particular challenge for a mint with such rudimentary technical skills.
Estimate: US$100000

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È la moneta dell’asta precedente ricomparsa nella Triton XVI, lot 284, 08.01.2013.

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Poros ‘Medallion’ from the Hunt Collection

KINGS of MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’. 336-323 BC. AR ‘Medallion’ of 5 Shekels or Dekadrachm (33mm, 38.75 g, 5h). Local (Satrapal) mint in Babylon. Struck circa 325-323 BC. Alexander, wearing military attire and holding couched xyston in right hand, on Boukephalos rearing right, attacking toward an elephant retreating right, upon which sits a helmeted mahout, holding goad and spear in left hand, turning around to throw another spear held aloft in his right hand, and, behind him, another helmeted figure, who also is turning around, his right hand holding the tip of Alexander’s xyston ; Ξ above / Alexander, wearing military attire and sword, standing facing, head left, holding thunderbolt in extended right hand, left hand holding spear set on ground to right; [above, Nike flying right, crowning him with wreath held in both her hands]; monogram to left. Price pp. 452–3 and pl. CLIX, G–H; F. Holt, Alexander the Great and the Mystery of the Elephant Medallions (Berkeley, 2003), Appendix A, E/A 10 (dies 2/F) = M.J. Price, “Circulation at Babylon in 323 B.C.” in Mnemata: Papers in Memory of Nancy M. Waggoner (New York, 1991), 13 = M.J. Price, “The ‘Porus’ Coinage of Alexander the Great: a Symbol of Concord and Community” in SPNO , Obv. B/Rev. d = MIG type 21, c (this coin). VF for type, toned, some minor cleaning marks, usual areas of weak strike, a few minor flan flaws. Extremely rare, one of ten examples known, five of which are in museums (ANS, BM [2], BN, and Copenhagen), and the only example from these dies.
Ex Gemini II (11 January 2006), lot 144; Nelson Bunker Hunt Collection (Sotheby's New York, 19 June 1991), lot 229; Numismatic Fine Arts V (23 February 1978), lot 81; Leu 13 (29 April 1975), lot 130; Near Babylon, 1973 Hoard (CH I 38).
 

Undoubtedly one of the most fascinating and intriguing issues associated with Alexander the Great, the ‘Poros’ Coinage has sparked debate about all aspects of its production and meaning. One point that is not contentious for a consensus of scholars is the interpretation of the designs; clearly they commemorate the great victory of Alexander against Poros at the Hydaspes. What is still debated is where, when, and under what circumstances were they produced. Both W. Hollstein (“Taxiles’ Prägung für Alexander den Grossen,” SNR 68 [1989], pp. 5-17) and F.L. Holt ( Alexander the Great and the Mystery of the Elephant Medallions [Berkeley, 2003]) advocate for an emission struck while Alexander was in India, though they differ on the circumstances. Curtius (8.12.15) mentions that, while Alexander was in Taxila prior to the battle at the Hydaspes, Taxiles (Omphis) gave Alexander 80 talents of silver ( signati argenti ), and Hollstein suggests that the Poros coinage was the form in which this silver was given to the Macedonian king. M.J. Price disagreed, noting that the medium of coinage at Taxila was silver punch-marked bars, and the use of Greek types and monograms by Taxiles would be unlikely (cf. Price p. 452, n. 9). Moreover, M.J. Olbrycht’s analysis of the regalia of Alexander on these coins concluded that they are Iranian, rather than Indian (“On Coin Portraits of Alexander the Great and His Iranian Regalia,” Notae Numismaticae VI [2011]: 13–27). Similarly, with the exception of the elephant and its riders, the types on the coins are of specifically Iranian, and not Indian, iconography (cf. M.J. Olbrycht, “Macedonia and Persia,” in J. Roisman and I. Worthington, A Companion to Ancient Macedonia [Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2007]: 361). None of these aspects of the coins seem consistent with an issue that Taxiles would strike for Alexander, and the depiction of such a battle scene is unlikely prior to the famous encounter at the Hydaspes, let alone an amicable exchange of gifts between these two kings (see also R.J. Lane Fox, “Text and Image: Alexander the Great, Coins and Elephants,” BICS 41 [1996]: 103–4). In contrast to Hollstein, Holt placed the issue after the battle of the Hydaspes and considered the coins as aristeia , awards for meritorious service that would be handed out after the conflict. Holt’s theory has two flaws. The first is that Alexander and Poros were allies following the conflict, so such an issue would be highly unlikely while Alexander was still in India. The second problem is that it seems unlikely that Alexander would decide at this point in his long campaign to use a medallion or coinage as aristeia , when other objects, such as spoils of the battle, would suffice (and probably had sufficed before).
The most significant problem for both Hollstein and Holt, however, is the record of where the ‘Poros’ coins have been found. Nearly all of the extant examples, of all the denominations in the series, are from the Iraq 1973 Hoard; only one coin, a dekadrachm, has an eastern provenance (Bukhara – but this provenance is only anecdotal). If this coinage was produced and distributed in the east, it seems incredible that nearly all that are known today would be from a single hoard found in the region of Babylonia. Moreover, the Poros coins in the hoard exhibit almost no wear, which suggests they did not circulate much, if at all, prior to the deposit of the hoard. It is more logical that the coins were produced in relatively close proximity to the hoard – in Babylonia. Although Price originally thought the issue belonged in India, he finally decided they probably had “a Mesopotamian origin” (Price, p. 452). R.J. Lane Fox, “Text and Image,” advanced a plausible argument for Susa, based on the coins’ epigraphy, AB monogram and Ξ, noting that these may equate to Aboulites, Alexander’s satrap of Susa, and Xenophilos, the garrison commander, who also was the keeper of the treasury in Susa. While this theory is intriguing, Lane Fox noted the difficulty of assigning the coins to Susa, which produced high quality Alexanders, and substantiating the circumstances for such a coinage by these two officers. This theory also ignores the Iranian character of the imagery noted by Olbryct, which would make little sense for an offical issue by the Macedonian administration as Lane Fox suggests. Price, who originally advanced the theory (“The Porus Coinage of Alexander the Great,” 83–4), rejected it as “highly speculative,” as did Hollstein and others.
In Babylonia at that time, there were at least two mints operating: an imperial mint in Babylon that produced the Alexander-type coinage, and at least one mint striking issues that were of a local character. This ‘local’ (or ‘satrapal’) mint was responsible for the Baal/Lion staters of Mazaios and his successors that were struck on the Babylonian shekel standard, and is thought to have produced coinage for the local Babylonian economy. If the ‘Poros Coinage’ was struck in Babylonia, it must have been at the ‘local’ mint, for the local coinage has the same characteristics – very thick flan, uneven striking, somewhat porous metal, less refined style – while the coins of the imperial mint were of a totally different character – relatively thinner flans, even striking, good metal, and a refined style. It is logical to assume that if this coinage was a commemorative coinage struck by Alexander for his Macedonian commanders, they would have been struck at the imperial mint, using its refined dies and higher quality metal. In fact, the imperial mint did produce a series of Alexander-type dekadrachms (Price 3598 and 3600), which were of the same high quality as the ubiquitous tetradrachms. The mint workers there had the experience to produce high quality dekadrachms, and it would only make sense for them to produce the ‘Poros Coinage’ if Alexander wanted to have them struck within the context of his imperial coinage. The fact that the coins were not produced there strongly suggests that they were not meant to be an official commemorative issue by Alexander for his Macedonian commanders. This also makes sense considering that Alexander never even issued a commemorative coinage for his greatest achievement, the defeat of the Persian Empire at Gaugamela, which had been not only his own goal, but the goal of his countrymen, and at least some of the Greeks who fought with him.
As the series was struck at the ‘local’ mint, it is most likely that the coins were struck for members of the local population, rather than any of the Macedonians or Greeks. At the time of the battle at the Hydaspes, there was a large contingent of troops in Alexander’s army who were raised from the local populations of the eastern satrapies (see, e.g., N.G.L. Hammond, “Alexander’s Non-European Troops and Ptolemy I’s Use of Such Troops,” BASP 33 [1996]: 99–109; and M.J. Olbryct, “First Iranian military units in the army of Alexander the Great,” Anabasis 2 [2011]: 67–84). Unlike the Macedonians and Greeks, who probably would have viewed Gaugamela as the most significant victory during their tenure under Alexander, to the troops raised from the populations of the east, the victory over Poros would have been the most important event in which they had participated. Thus, the event commemorated on the coins, the regalia of the figures on the coins, and the particular mint point to the recipients being local, probably Iranian, leaders who had served under Alexander. The identification of the exact people involved, however, cannot yet be determined with certainty, although Alexander’s Persian Companion Cavalry (Arr. 7.6.3) is an attractive possibility (the horseman on the obverse may serve a dual purpose as a reference to both Alexander and the Persian cavalrymen, both of whom would have been armed with a xyston as depicted on the coins). Alexander’s popularity among the eastern leaders was significantly high, possibly even more so more than among his war-weary countrymen and accompanying Greeks, so he certainly would have had good reason to reward them with such an issue (see also Olbrycht, “Macedonia and Persia,” 361). Using the local mint, which was controlled by Alexander’s Babylonian satrap, for such a purpose would be perfectly reasonable.

Triton XVI, Lot: 284. Estimate $75000. Sold for $75000.

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Script. Hist. Aug. Vita tirannorum triginta, XIV, 6

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6 ...

Tutto questo ho incluso perché si dice che coloro che portano su di sé un’immagine di Alessandro impressa nell'oro o nell'argento sono assistiti dalla fortuna in ogni loro azione.

Detto preso alla lettera inserendo una dramma del Grande in un pendente d’oro (Agora Auctions 10).

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Medals & Tokens 
Coin Jewelry. Handmade 14K gold pendant. Alexander III of Macedon. A handmade 14K gold fitted pendant, looped for suspension, housing a silver drachm of Alexander III, the Great (336-323 B.C.).

 Resta da stabilire la ‘casa’/zecca della dramma che è stata così 'accasata'.

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La zecca è quella di Magnesia al Meandro, il conio è del 305-297 a. C. circa e il numero di catalogo Price da me attribuito è il 1995.

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Dramma Price 1995 (Roma Numismatics 53).

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Kings of Thrace, Lysimachos AR Drachm. Struck in the name and types of Alexander III. Magnesia ad Maeandrum, 305-297 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, holding sceptre; N above E in left field, monogram beneath throne, AΛEΞANΔPOY to right. Price 1995. 4.20g, 17mm, 1h. 

Very Fine. From a private German collection.

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Dramma Price 1995 con Zeus a gambe incrociate (VCoins).

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Alexander III The Great AR Drachm. Magnesia Mint Struck circa 305-297 BC. Obverse: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion’s skin headdress. Reverse: Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre; N/E in left field, A below throne. References: Price 1995. Size: 17mm, 4.23g. Professional Numismatic Notes: Attractive VF!

 

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