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King John
Posted (edited)
Numismatica Ars Classica > Auction 124 Auction date: 23 June 2021
Lot number: 49

Price realized: This lot is for sale in an upcoming auction 
 
Lot description:
Sicily, Aetna.
Drachm circa 476-470, AR 4.17 g. Horseman at pace r. within dotted border. Rev. AITN – AI – ON Zeus seated r., holding thunderbolt and eagle-tipped sceptre. Dobretsberger, MONG 1961, 6, p. 49-50. ACGC p. 212 (this coin mentioned). C. Boehringer, JNG 18, 1968, pp. 67-98 and pl. 7, 2 (this coin). de Callataÿ-Gitler, The Coin of Coins, A World premiere. The Israel Museum, Jerusalem 2004, p. 29 and footnote 17.
Apparently unique. An issue of tremendous importance and fascination. Of fine late
Archaic style and with a delicate old cabinet tone. About extremely fine
Ex Auctiones 20, 1990, 117 and Morton & Eden 9 June 2011, 202 sales.
As a means of exerting his dominance over other Greek cities of Sicily, particularly those with non-Dorian populations, the Syracusan tyrant Hieron I employed a policy of depopulating established centers and founding new cities. Such was the case of Catana and Leontini in 476 BC. The tyrant compelled the inhabitants of these cities to move to Naxos and repopulated Catana with 10,000 Dorian Greek settlers from Syracuse and the Peloponnesus. Having completely changed the ethnic makeup of Catana, Hieron I also renamed it as Aetna and established his son to rule it as a king. However, Hieron I died soon after and the Deinomenid tyranny was overthrown in Syracuse. In 461 BC, the exiled people of Catana returned to their old homes and expelled the Aetnaeans. They subsequently seized the native Sicel settlement of Inessa and used it to found a new city named Aetna. This apparently unique drachm was struck during the early period of Catana's refoundation as Aetna and as such is an enduring monument to the harsh policies of Hieron I. The obverse horseman type, which is drawn from contemporary drachms of Syracuse leaves no doubt as to who controlled Aetna. It is paired perfectly with a similarly unique tetradrachm of Aetna featuring a slow biga that is very similar to that found on Syracusan tetradrachms of the same period. The reverse type, depicting a spectacular enthroned figure of Zeus, however, is purely local. The king of the Olympians is rendered in a beautiful Archaic style and his throne includes wonderful details like the palmettes on the legs. The image is also especially interesting for the unusual placement of Zeus' attributes, the scepter and the eagle. Whereas he usually holds these in his hands, here the scepter stands beside the god with the eagle perched on top.

Estimate: 60000 CHF

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beh, ma nessuno si prende la briga di stampare e rilegare in un libro questa straordinaria discussione di 120 pagine che costituisce un patrimonio incredibile di testimonianze artistiche, le più alte

Buonasera. Che ne dite di iniziare una discussione tutta dedicata alle più belle rappresentazioni di guerrieri sulle monete greche?

Crete, Polyrhenion AR Stater. 4th century BC. Magistrate Charisthe. Laureate head of Zeus to right / Head of sacrificial bull facing, with pendant fillets hanging from horns; ΧΑΡΙΣΘΕ above, ΠΟΛΥΡΗΝΙΟΝ

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King John
Posted (edited)
Nomos AG > Auction 22 Auction date: 22 June 2021
Lot number: 352

Price realized: This lot is for sale in an upcoming auction 
 

Lot description:
Gallienus, 253-268. (Bronze, 32 mm, 14.90 g, 6 h), after 260. Synnada in Phrygia. ΑΥΤ ΚAI Π ΛΙΚ ΓΑΛΛΙΗΝΟC / CΕΒ Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Gallienus to right. Rev. CYNNAΔEΩN A scene from an amphitheater depicting a venatio: across the center, a lion chasing a stag to left; below, a bestiarius attacking a boar with a spear; above, Orpheus prostrate after being mauled by a bear. BMC 66 = J. Nolle, "Kaiserliche Privilegien für Gladiatorenmunera und Tierhetzen: Unbekannte und ungedeutete Zeugnisse auf städtischen Münzen des griechischen Ostens", JNG 42/43, 1992/1993, p. 51, 2b = M. Price, "Paintings as a Source of Inspiration for Ancient Die Engravers", Studies Trell p. 70, fig. 1 = SNG von Aulock 3997 (same dies). E. S. G. Robinson, "Coins from Lycia and Pamphylia", JHS 34, 1914, p. 37, 24 (not illustrated). SNG Lewis 1560 (same dies). With an imaginative portrait of the emperor, a dark green patina and a most interesting scene on the reverse. Clear and well-centered. Good very fine.

Orpheus was a legendary prophet in Greek mythology, and he was often depicted in mosaics charming wild beasts with his lyre. In most versions of the myth, he was killed by maenads who could no longer endure his excessive mourning for his dead wife, Eurydice, after his failure to retrieve her from the underworld. However, as with many Greek myths, there is an alternate version of Orpheus' demise. In this little-known version, Orpheus is mauled and killed by a bear. The Oxford Classical Dictionary, (3rd ed., 1996), s.v. venation's cites gladiatorial re-enactments of Orpheus' death-by-bear that took place in the late 1st century: apparently convicted criminals were drafted in to play the part of Orpheus. Needless to say, there were no encores. It is likely that such an event is shown here.

Estimate: 1500 CHF

ILLUSTRAZIONE: mosaico raffigurante  una venatio, o caccia agli animali selvatici, Piazza Armerina

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King John
Leu Numismatik AG > Web Auction 16 Auction date: 22 May 2021
Lot number: 3167

Price realized: 460 CHF   (Approx. 512 USD / 420 EUR)   Note: Prices do not include buyer's fees.
 

Lot description:
ASIA MINOR. Uncertain. 2nd-3rd centuries. Tessera (Lead, 17 mm, 2.26 g). Two gladiators confronting each other; the one on the left holding a large rectangular shield, a crested helmet and a sword; the one on the right holding a spear. Apparently unpublished. Minor surface cracks, otherwise, good very fine.
From a collection of lead tesserae from Asia Minor.
Starting Price: 50 CHF

ILLUSTRAZIONE: RILIEVO RAFFIGURANTE DEI GLADIATORI (COLOSSEO)

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King John
Posted (edited)
Numismatica Ars Classica > Auction 124 Auction date: 23 June 2021
Lot number: 69

Price realized: This lot is for sale in an upcoming auction 
 
Lot description:


Syracuse.
Stater circa 278 under Pyrrhus, AV 8.55 g. Head of Athena r., wearing triple-crested Corinthian helmet, bowl decorated with pegasus, triple-pendant earring and pearl necklace; behind, owl and beneath neck truncation, A. Rev. BAΣIΛEΩΣ – ΠYPPOY Nike alighting l., holding a wreath in her r. hand and a trophy in her l.; at her feet, on l., bucranium. BMC 1. Jameson 1124 (these dies). Gulbenkian 910 (this obverse die). Kraay-Hirmer pl. 151, 475 (these dies). AMB 522 (these dies). Buttrey, NC 1973, pl. 2, 42 (these dies).
Extremely rare and among the finest specimens in private hands. An interesting and
fascinating issue with a lovely portrait of excellent style and a finely engraved
reverse composition. An unobtrusive mark on cheek and a small edge nick at
nine o'clock on reverse, otherwise about extremely fine / extremely fine

Ex Leu 42, Zurich, 1987, 214; Leu 52, 1991, 67 and New York XXVII, 2012, Prospero 342 sales.
In 280 BC, Pyrrhus of Epirus accepted the request of Tarentum to defend it and the other cities of Magna Graecia from the expanding power of Rome. The Epirote king defeated the Romans at both at Herakleia (280 BC) and at Asculum (279 BC), but at such high cost that it became clear that if he continued to win battles in this way his army would soon be destroyed. In 278 BC, while considering his options, the Syracusans begged him to come and fight the Carthaginians who had always been at war with the Greek cities for control of Sicily. As a break from the problematic Roman war, Pyrrhos accepted this diversion and was so successful that by 277 BC he had all but driven the Carthaginians from the island and claimed the title of King of Sicily. All that remained was to expel the Punic garrison from Lilybaeum, but because of its location, the only way to do this was through a naval blockade. The only way to obtain the ships for the blockade was to obtain money from the Greek cities to build and man a proper fleet. When the cities balked at this necessity, Pyrrhus imposed his own garrisons. This development immediately destroyed the king's previous popularity in Sicily and the Greek cities began negotiating with the Carthaginians against him! Realizing that Sicily would be nothing but trouble to rule, Pyrrhus inflicted one further defeat on a new Punic army and then returned to Italy for a second round against the Romans.
This stunning gold stater was struck at Syracuse in the context of Pyrrhos' wars against the Carthaginians. It is a true work of art in the way that it has taken the standard Athena and Nike types introduced by Alexander the Great in c. 334 BC and really run with them in terms of the high Hellenistic sculptural style and the manipulation of the details to be specific to Pyrrhus. Whereas a fairly stiff Nike usually proffers the laurel wreath of victory on traditional Alexandrine staters, here she holds the oak wreath of Zeus. This is a specific reference to the Epirote kingdom and its famous oracular shrine of Zeus at Dodona. Other issues struck at Syracuse during Pyrrhus' Sicilian campaigns also feature reverse types surrounded by oak wreaths as an allusion to their connection to the king of Epirus. Likewise, while Nike usually carries a stylus indicative of naval victory on Alexandrine staters, here she carries a trophy that directly refers to Pyrrhus' Italian campaign. The trophy includes a distinctive oblong shield which can hardly be anything but the scutum shield regularly used by Roman soldiers ever since they adopted it from the Gauls in the fourth century BC.
The obverse head of Athena also represents an artistic leap forward from the basic design of Alexander's staters, with increased modelling of the face and the addition of new details, like the tiny owl behind her head and the hound decorating the bowl of her helmet. As with the modifications to the Alexandrine reverse type, the hound also represents a means of advertising Pyrrhus and his Epirote origin. The helmet of Athena on standard Alexandrine staters is usually decorated with a coiled serpent, a griffin, sphinx, or bird, but here we find a hound. This almost certainly refers to the Epirote district of Molossis, which was famous for the hunting dogs bred there.

Estimate: 60000 CHF

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King John
Numismatica Ars Classica > Auction 124 Auction date: 23 June 2021
Lot number: 84

Price realized: This lot is for sale in an upcoming auction 
 

Lot description:


Alexander III, 336 – 323 and posthumous issues.
Decadrachm of 5 shekels, Babylon circa 327, AR 40.08 g. Alexander on Bucephalus facing r., spearing at a mahout and his master seated on an Indian elephant retreating r.; the mahout and master look back towards Alexander, the latter grasps the end of Alexander's sarissa with his r. hand, the former brandishes a spear in his r. hand above his head while holding two further spears in his l. hand; above, [Ξ]. Rev. Alexander standing l. in military attire, wearing plumed Phrygian (?) helmet and holding a thunderbolt in his r. hand and a sarissa in his l.; above, Nike flies r. to crown him. In lower l. field AB ligate. BMC 61 and pl. XXII, 18. Price, Circulation at Babylon in 323 B.C. in Mnemata: Papers in Memory of Nancy M. Waggoner, p. 70, 12 and pl. 15, 12 (this coin illustrated). Price, The Poros coinage of Alexander the Great, a Symbol of Concord and Community, in Studia Paolo Naster Oblata, pp. 75-6, OA/Rc. Mitchiner Type 21. Dürr, Neues aus Babylonien, SM 94, May 1974, p. 36, 1.
Exceedingly rare, ten specimens known of which only five are in private hands. An issue
of tremendous importance and fascination, of which this is undoubtedly one of the
finest specimens known. Areas of weakness, but unusually clear and complete and
with an unusually metal good for the issue. Good very fine

Ex New York sale XXVII, 2012, Prospero 304. Privately purchased from Spink & Son 15 July 1989.
In 327 BC, Alexander the Great and his army entered the Indian subcontinent and made war on a regional Punjabi king named Porus. At the Battle of the Hydaspes River (327 BC), the Macedonian army faced the Indian forces of Porus and his war elephants-terrifying creatures that no Macedonian or Greek in Alexander's army had ever seen or faced in battle before. However, despite the fear inspired by the elephants and the deadly accuracy of Porus' archers, Alexander's army won the day. Respecting the bravery and fighting spirit of Porus, Alexander appointed him as a local satrap to govern the region on his behalf. Alexander then continued the exploration and attempted conquest of India despite the increasing misgivings of his men. At last, in 325 BC, the army finally mutinied near the Ganges River and forced him to begin the long and grueling westward march home. This extremely rare coin, one of the so-called "Porus medallions", is thought to have been struck as a form of commemorative donative paid out to the army after the return from India. The apparent use of the shekel weight standard has led to the conclusion that the coinage was produced at Babylon or possibly Susa while the specifically Indian and martial types may have been intended to remind recipients of their former glory in the East at a time when the army was tiring of Alexander's campaigns and desirous of returning home to Macedonia. In 324 BC, the army mutinied again at Opis in Babylonia and demanded that Alexander begin demobilizing his loyal and long-serving veterans. The present piece-the largest denomination in the "Porus medallion" series-features remarkable types that are completely new for Greek coinage. The obverse seems to represent a remarkable duel between Alexander, charging right on the back of his famous steed Boukephalos, and Porus riding on the back of an elephant with an attendant. Alexander spears the attendant in the back while Porus turns to attack him. What is most interesting about this type, in addition to the fact that it is one of the earliest numismatic representations of an elephant, is that the duel shown here never seems to have taken place. The type, especially when read in connection with the reverse showing Alexander crowned by Nike, implies a direct victory over Porus in personal combat. However, none of the ancient historians, including Arrian, Curtius, or Plutarch ever suggest that any sort of duel like this ever took place. Instead, they report that Alexander fought alongside his own cavalry, but also watched Porus fight with admiration, frequently sending messengers to ask him to surrender in the hope that the Indian king would not realize his plan to die in battle. In the end, Porus did surrender, but not because he had been defeated personally by the Macedonian king, but because he was conquered by thirst and exhaustion. In short, the type is really puffed up propaganda for Alexander's greatness. The reverse depicts the full figure image of Alexander the Great fully armed and armored for battle and crowned by Nike. This is the first unequivocal portrait of the famous Macedonian king on a coin (there still remains much doubt as to whether the image of Herakles on his imperial tetradrachms was considered to represent Alexander during his lifetime), but even here he is shown as something more than a mere mortal. He is elevated to the level of Zeus, the supreme god of the Olympian pantheon, by the placement of a thunderbolt in his hand. The type seems to advertise Alexander not only as a world conqueror, but as a conqueror of the universe extending even into the realm of the gods. The type appears to be related to a lost painting of "Alexander wielding a thunderbolt" executed by the court painter Apelles.

Estimate: 300000 CHF

Illustrazione: scena tratta dal film "Alexander", regia di Oliver Stone

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King John
Posted (edited)
Numismatica Ars Classica > Auction 125 Auction date: 23 June 2021
Lot number: 419

Price realized: This lot is for sale in an upcoming auction 
 

Lot description:
C. Piso L.f. Frugi. Denarius 61, AR 3.93 g. Head of Apollo r., wearing taenia; behind, stand surmounted by ring. Rev. Horseman galloping r., wearing conical hat, holding palm frond and reins; above, wing and in exergue, C PISO L FR[V]. Babelon Calpurnia 24a. Sydenham 847. RBW –. Hersh 397. Crawford 408/1b. Wonderful iridescent tone and good extremely fine Ex Leu Fixed price list 19, 1984, 83.
Graded Ch Au Strike 5/5 Surface 4/5, NGC certification number 4282926-008.
Estimate: 750 CHF

ILLUSTRAZIONE: IL CALCIATORE KEVIN MBABU DELLA NAZIONALE SVIZZERA CON LA SUA ACCONCIATURA "APOLLINEA"

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King John
NUMISMATICA ARS CLASSICA NAC, Auction 114, lot 907, 6/05/2019
Constantius II, 337 – 361. Medallion 350, Æ 18.19 g. D N CONSTAN – TIVS P F AVG Laurel and rosette-diademed bust l., wearing imperial mantle and chlamys; raising r. hand. Rev. VICTORIA – AVGVSTORVM Constantius II in military dress and chlamys standing r., holding spear in his l. hand, head turned l. towards Victory standing l., head turned r., placing her l. arm around the emperor's shoulders; she holds palm branch in her r. hand. C 238. Gnecchi I, 35 and pl. 137, 5. W. Froehner, Les Médallions de l'Empire Romain depuis le règne de Auguste jusqu'à Priscus Attale, p. 309. P. Bastien, Le Buste monétaire des empereurs romains, Numismatique romaine 19, pp. 559–572, pl. 190, 7. RIC 409. M.-M. Bendenoun, Coins of the Ancient World, A portrait of the JDL Collection, Tradart, 2009, 89 (this coin).
Extremely rare. A spectacular medallion, work of a very skilled master-engraver.
An unusual portrait in the finest style of the period and an interesting reverse
composition. Perfectly struck and centred on a very large flan, lovely
green patina with some minor areas of corrosion on
obverse, otherwise extremely fine
Ex M&M 76, 1991, 912; New York III, 2000, 788 and NAC-Tradart 79, 2014, 45 (illustrated on the front cover page) sales.
The dating of late Roman medallions is especially difficult since they rarely have inscriptions with precise chronological infor- mation. This undated medallion of Constantius II is part of a close-knit group of pieces that Kent suggests was struck at the Rome mint in the first half of 350. The period is bracketed by Magnentius' overthrow of the Emperor Constans on January 18 and the short-lived counter-rebellion of Nepotian starting on June 3 of that same year. Though this medallion very likely was struck during Magnentius' occupation of Rome, the possibility that it was struck either soon before or soon after this eventful half-year cannot be dismissed. It would seem that many base metal medallions of this era were struck for festivities associated with the New Year and/or the assumption of the consulship early in January. Thus, the period of January 18 through June 3 would preclude those occasions. Even so, it was an eventful era with ample reasons for the issuance of medallions at irregular times. In Kent's group of January 19 to June 3 there was much sharing of reverse dies among the different issues. For example, Magnentius and Constantius II shared dies in this period for the issues RIC 404/405 and 406/407. Yet, medallions in this group are also die linked to ones attributed by Kent to earlier and later periods. Examples include one of Magnentius (RIC 414) that shares a reverse die with a medallion of Constans (RIC 394) attributed to the period 347 to January 19, 350, and the present issue of Constantius II (RIC 409) which is reverse die-linked with a medallion of Decentius (RIC 417) attributed to the period of Spring 351 through September 26, 352. The sharing of dies from both earlier and later periods demands caution in holding too strictly to any proposed chronology. Thus, the question thus remains: was this medallion issued before, du- ring, or after the first half of 350? If before that period the issuer would be Constans, if during, Magnentius, if soon afterward it may have been Nepotian or Magnentius. We might presume that throughout the political upheavals of the era the Rome mint continued to operate, striking at the behest of whoever was in power at the moment, and often using dies that had been prepared when the city had been under other authority. Thus, all that can be said with certainty is that this medallion was issued in the name of Constantius II, presumably in the year 350.

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King John
Savoca Numismatik GmbH & Co. KG > Online Auction 104 | Silver Auction date: 30 May 2021
Lot number: 162
Price realized: 1,700 EUR   (Approx. 2,074 USD)   Note: Prices do not include buyer's fees.
 
Lot description:
Mysia. Pergamon. Septimius Severus, with Julia Domna AD 193-211. Claudius Terpandros, strategos
Medallion Æ
46 mm, 45,94 g
AVT KAI Λ C[EΠ] CEOVHPO[O]C ΠΕΡ around, IΟΥ ΔΟΜΝΑ CΕΒΑCΤΗ in two lines below, confronted busts of Severus right, laureate, draped, and cuirassed, and Domna left, draped / ΕΠΙ CΤΡΑ [ΚΛ]ΑΥΔΙΑΝΟΥ ΤΕΡΠΑΝ-ΔΡΟΥ ΠΕΡΓΑΜΗΝΩΝ Β ΝΕΟΚΟΡΩΝ, sacrificial scene in fron of the Neokore-Temple of Pergamon; The statue of the emperor in military dress with sceptre and patera stands on a high, rectangular base, in front of it standing sacrificial priest, who with raised axe is about to slay a bull standing whose head is lowered down.
very fine
v. Fritze pl. VIII,15; SNG Aulock -.
Starting Price: 1500 EUR

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King John
Leu Numismatik AG > Web Auction 15 Auction date: 27 February 2021
Lot number: 129
Price realized: 150 CHF   (Approx. 166 USD / 136 EUR)   Note: Prices do not include buyer's fees.
 
Lot description:
KINGS OF THRACE. Agathokles, son of Lysimachos, circa 290s-283/2 BC. AE (Bronze, 13 mm, 2.26 g, 11 h), Adramyteion. Laureate head of Apollo to right. Rev. AΓAΘO Double-bodied owl standing facing. HGC 3 -. Terin Series 7, 8. Very rare. Very fine.
Tekin has recently reattributed the coins of 'Agathokleia' to Agathokles, the oldest son of Lysimachos, who was his father's right-hand man in the late 290s and 280s BC. Unfortunately for him, Lysimachos' second wife, Arsinoe, plotted against him and he was executed in 283/2 BC on charges of conspiracy against the old king. Agathokles' wife, Lysandra, a daughter of Ptolemy I, escaped the trial and fled to Seleukos, who marched against Lysimachos and killed him in the Battle of Korupedion in 281 BC - the decisive battle between the last of Alexander's surviving generals.

Starting Price: 25 CHF

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King John
Nomos AG > Auction 22 Auction date: 22 June 2021
Lot number: 255

Price realized: This lot is for sale in an upcoming auction
 
Lot description:
PHILISTIA (PALESTINE)
Gaza. 5th-4th centuries BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 24 mm, 17.49 g, 11 h). Head of Athena to right, wearing a crested Attic helmet, with a palmette and scroll on the bowl and three upright olive leaves above the visor, and a disc earring. Rev. Zayin - 'Ayin Owl standing facing with wings closed, between two olive sprays each with a berry; all within incuse square. BMC pl. XLII, 1. Boston MFA 2203. Gitler & Tal V.5T = HGC 10, 532. P. van Alfen, "Two Unpublished Hoards and Other Owls from Egypt", AJN 14, 2002, pl. 15, 9 (same dies). Svoronos pl. 110, 49. Extremely rare. Very well-struck and well-centered with the crest of Athena's helmet fully visible. A most attractive coin of great interest and importance. Just a touch of wear on the highest points, otherwise, extremely fine.
This amazing coin, the finest of only four known examples, was struck at Gaza, probably during the final third of the fifth century (or slightly later), and copies the well-known types of Athens. Athenian coins circulated widely in trade throughout the Mediterranean world, though especially in the Levant. The head of Athena, with her frontal eye and Attic helmet, precisely copies the heads that appeared on the abundant Athenian tetradrachms produced in the third quarter of the 5th century, but the reverse is a surprise. Instead of the usual owl standing to right of the tetradrachms, what we have here is the facing owl found on contemporary Athenian triobols. It would certainly be interesting to know if any of those triobols have been found in the area of ancient Palestine: in any case, they must have been the model used for this coin. The letters on the reverse, reading from right to left 'Ayin Zayin (or 'Z), are the abbreviated form of the city name, Gaza, but which was typically written Aza, and interestingly the letter 'Ayin has an added central pellet assimilating it to the form of the letter È which appears on the genuine Athenian coins of this period.
Estimate: 30000 CHF

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King John
Auktionshaus H. D. Rauch GmbH > E-Auction 36 Auction date: 19 February 2021
Lot number: 76
Price realized: 26 EUR   (Approx. 32 USD)   Note: Prices do not include buyer's fees.
 

Lot description:
TROAS. Birytis.
Bronze (1,25 g), ca. 4.-3. Jhdt. v. Chr. Kopf eines Kabeiros mit Pilos, darüber zwei Sterne / Keule im Lorbeerkranz. Klein 301, SNG Cop 247-248. Winzige Auflagen. s.sch.+
Starting Price: 24 EUR

ILLUSTRAZIONE: 

A PILOS TYPE BRONZE HELMET
4TH CENTURY B.C.
Of conical form with carinated lip above the broad brim, the front with two rearing confronting ibex in relief, remains of riveted attachment plates for crest on the crown's apex, two pierced holes on lower edge at either side, incised lines around the perimeter, minor restoration. 9 5/8 in. (24.5 cm.) high.
Text & Provenance: Christie's Live Auction 9482 of 06.11.2002, lot: 78.
Estimate: GBP 25,000 - GBP 35,000, Price realized: GBP 32,900.

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King John
Roma Numismatics Ltd > E-Sale 81 Auction date: 25 February 2021
Lot number: 406
Price realized: 460 GBP   (Approx. 650 USD / 532 EUR)   Note: Prices do not include buyer's fees.
 

Lot description:
Lesbos, Mytilene EL Hekte. Circa 375-325 BC. Head of Dioskouros to right, wearing wreathed pilos; two stars flanking / Head of Persephone to right, within linear square frame. Bodenstedt 99; SNG von Aulock -; SNG Copenhagen 321. 2.52g, 11mm, 6h.
Good Very Fine.
From the inventory of a UK dealer.
Estimate: 350 GBP

illustrazione: 

A PILOS TYPE BRONZE HELMET
CIRCA 4TH CENTURY B.C.
Of conical form with carinated lip above the broad brim, decorated in relief with a finely detailed berried olive wreath, the helmet pierced with holes for attachments. 9½ in. (24.1 cm.) high.
Text & Provenance: Christie's Live Auction 9482 of 06.11.2002, lot: 75.
Estimate: GBP 25,000 - GBP 35,000, Price realized: GBP 69,750.

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