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Illyricum65

Sesterzi... che passione!

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Illyricum65

Ciao,

anche se spesso il mio campo d'interesse è attirato dal tribolato III secolo, continuo a subire il fascino dell'oricalco.

Di seguito posto delle monete a mio avviso stupende, proposte da NAC (http://www.arsclassicacoins.com/), asta 74, 18 novembre 2013.

Questa so che attirerà l'attenzione di Mirko 8710

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AUGUSTUS, January 16 , 27 BC– August 19, 14. M. Salvius Otho. Triumphal bronze as or dupondius, Rome 7 BC, Æ 19.54 g. Obv. CAESAR AVGVST PONT MAX TRI-BVNIC POT Laureate head of Augustus left; in right field, Victory left adjusting Augustus’ laurel-wreath with right hand and holding cornucopia in left hand; border of dots. Rev. . M × SALVIVS × OTHO × III × VIR × A × A × A × F × F × around S - C; border of dots. Literature Cohen 518–519 BMC RE I, 43, 224, pl. 20, 5 RIC I2, 75, 429; BN 686 R. Göbl, Antike Numismatik, Munich, 1978, 2819 (this coin) H. A. Grueber, “Roman Bronze Coinage from B.C. 45–3”, NC 1904, 56, pl. XIV, 9 G. E. Rizzo, La base di Augusto, Rome, 1933, p. 101 (obverse, this coin) Kent-Hirmer pl. 39, 140 (obverse) Wealth of the Ancient World 122 (this coin) M.-M. Bendenoun, Coins of the Ancient World, A Portrait of the JDL Collection, Tradart, Genève, 2009, 46 (this coin). Condition Very rare and undoubtedly the finest specimen known. A wonderful portrait struck on a very large flan and an untouched dark green patina. Extremely fine. Provenance Sotheby’s, Hunt sale I, New York 1990, lot 122. Bank Leu AG 10, Zürich 1974, lot 25. Naville & Co-Ars Classica 11, Luzern 1925, lot 224. Naville & Co 2, Genève 1922, Lot 176. From the Weintraub, Levis, and Vautier - Collignon collections. Note When Tiberius entered Rome in 7 B.C. to assume his second consulship, he also celebrated the triumph he had been awarded for his successful campaigns of recent years, notably in Germany. The distinctive bronzes that show Augustus crowned by Victory are linked to this event by Mattingly, Dressel, Giard, Carson, Kent and Sutherland. The moneyers M. Salvius Otho, P. Lurius Agrippa and M. Maecilius Tullus are thought to comprise the college of 7 B.C., as only they produced these bronzes. There is no consensus on denomination, as their weights range from less than 10 to more than 17 grams, and they are struck on planchets that sometimes are too small for the dies and other times are markedly oversized and with somewhat ornamented borders. It is possible that more than one denomination was intended, as Sutherland proposed by describing some as dupondii and others as asses. Mattingly tentatively describes them as dupondii, but refers to them as a ‘Triumphal Coinage,’ and Grant and Giard classify them as medallions rather than coins. After the event that merited this triumphal coinage had passed, Tiberius’ honours continued in 6 B.C. with his being awarded the tribunician power for another five years. With Marcus Agrippa and Nero Claudius Drusus recently deceased, and Augustus’ grandsons still young, everything pointed to Tiberius being Augustus’ successor, even if he had never been the first choice. However, Tiberius soon found life in the capital intolerable: he disliked his civilian duties, detested his wife Julia, and he must have realised that his high honours were little more than interim measures by Augustus, who was awaiting the maturation of his grandsons Gaius Caesar and Lucius Caesar. Thus, in 6 B.C. he left Rome for eight years of self-exile on the island of Rhodes, returning only after Gaius and Lucius were dead, and Augustus had no other viable option for a successor.

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TIBERIUS, 17 (?) September 14–March 16, 37.
In the name of Agrippina died October 18, 33. Struck by Gaius, March 18, 37–January 24, 41. Sestertius, Rome 37–41, Æ 30.58 g.
Obv. AGRIPPINA M F MAT C CAESARIS AVGVSTI Draped bust of Agrippina right; border of dots. Rev. S P Q R / MEMORIAE / AGRIPPINAE Carpentum drawn by two mules left; the cover supported by figures, and with ornamented side; border of dots. Literature Cohen 1 BMC RE I 159, 85, pl. 30, 6 RIC I2, 112, 55 BN 128 Kent-Hirmer pl. 47, 164 (obverse) and 46, 164 (reverse) Sutherland 292–293 W. Trillmich, Familienpropaganda der kaiser Caligula und Claudius Agrippina maior und Antonia augusta Berlin 1978, Gruppe III Wealth of the Ancient World 124 (this coin) M.-M. Bendenoun, Coins of the Ancient World, A Portrait of the JDL Collection, Tradart, Genève, 2009, 49 (this coin). Condition Very rare and among the finest specimens known. A delicate portrait of sublime style, Tiber tone. Extremely fine. Provenance Tradart Genève SA, Genève 1993, lot 197. Sotheby’s, Hunt sale I, New York 1990, lot 124. Bank Leu AG 7, Zürich 1973, lot 338. From the Hunt and Weintraub collections. Note Agrippina Senior was among the most deserving, yet least fortunate of the Julio-Claudian women. After her marriage in A.D. 5 to Augustus’ preferred heir, Germanicus, she was poised to achieve a status on par with the empress Livia. However, with the death of Augustus and the accession of Tiberius, power within the dynasty shifted decisively from the Julians to the Claudians. Even though Agrippina’s marriage offered a union of the two bloodlines, her prospects did not survive under Tiberius. When Germanicus died at Antioch late in A.D. 19 under suspicious circumstances, Agrippina devoted herself to opposing Tiberius and his prefect Sejanus. Finally, in 29, Tiberius deprived her of freedom, and in 33 she died in exile. Three issues of sestertii were struck for Agrippina Senior, all posthumously. The first, produced by her son Caligula, shows on its reverse a carpentum; the second, issued by her brother Claudius, has on its reverse a large SC surrounded by a Claudian inscription; the third is a restoration of the Claudian type by the emperor Titus (79-81), whose inscriptions are substituted for those of Claudius. The obvese inscription on Caligula’s issue, AGRIPPINA M F MAT C CAESARIS AVGVSTI, describes Agrippina as the daughter of Marcus (Agrippa) and the mother of Gaius (Caligula). Claudius’ inscription also identifies her as Agrippa’s daughter, but ends GERMANICI CAESARIS, thus shifting the focus from her being the mother of Caligula to being the widow of Claudius’ deceased brother Germanicus. Distinctions in the portraits follow the same lines as the inscriptions: on the issue of Caligula, Agrippina has a slender profile like that of her son, whereas on Claudius’ her face is broader and fuller, in keeping with his appearance.

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Illyricum65

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NERO, October 13, 54–June 9, 68. Sestertius, Lyon, 64–67, Æ 27.01 g. Obv. NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P IMP P His laureate head left, below the edge of the bust, globe; border of dots. Rev. S - C Triumphal arch, hung with wreath across front and left side; above, Nero in a facing quadriga escorted by Pax and Victory; on the extreme left and right, below the level of the quadriga, figures of soldiers; in a niche in the side, statue of Mars standing; the faces and plinths of the arch are ornamented with elaborate reliefs; border of dots. Literature Cohen - cf. 306 BMC RE I - cf. 265, 330, pl. 46, 5 RIC I2 - cf. 175, 393 BN - cf. 69 D. W. MacDowall, “The Western Coinage of Nero”, NNM 161, 1979, - cf. 414; G. Fuchs, “Architekturdarstellungen auf römischen Münzen der Republik und der frühen Kaiserzeit”, AMuGS 1, Berlin, 1969, pl. 14, 142 (reverse) M. J. Price & B. L. Trell, Coins and their Cities: London, 1977, 107 (reverse) H. Küthmann, B Overbeck, D. Steinhilber & I. Weber, Bauten Roms auf Münzen und Medaillen, Munich, 1973, 106 (reverse) Ph. V. Hill, “Buildings and Monuments of Rome as Coin Types, AD 14–69”, NC 1983, - cf. pl. 15, 12 (head right); Kent-Hirmer pl. 57, 202 (variant). For all these references: NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P IMP P P on obverse. M.-M. Bendenoun, Coins of the Ancient World, A Portrait of the JDL Collection, Tradart, Genève, 2009, 51 (this coin). Condition A bold portrait and a finely detailed reverse composition, green patina. About extremely fine. Provenance Numismatic Fine Arts Inc. VI, Beverly Hills 1979, lot 642. Note Like many Roman monuments, the appearance of the Arcus Neronis is known only from its illustrations on coinage. Details about the date and the location of the arch, which probably did not long survive Nero’s downfall, are sketchy. However, coins provide an excellent and detailed understanding of its form, while offering some notable variety in the reliefs, decorative elements and statues that adorned it. It is generally believed that the arch was erected for victories over the Parthians by the general Corbulo, and that it was built on the Capitoline Hill sometime between 58 and 62. Its precise location has not been determined from ancient sources or from the archaeological record, though it may have been near the Temple of Vejovis or the Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus. This sestertius was issued during one of the rare moments of ‘universal peace’ in the Empire. Suetonius (Nero 15) describes the visit to Rome of Tiridates, Nero’s candidate for the throne of Armenia, following Corbulo’s victories over the Parthians. Tiridates made a ceremonial supplication to Nero and was crowned king of his homeland, after which “the people then hailed Nero as Imperator and, after dedicating a laurel-wreath in the Capital, he closed the double doors of the Temple of Janus, as a sign that all war was at an end.”


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VESPASIAN, end August 69–June 23, 79. Sestertius, Rome 71, Æ 27.59 g. Obv. IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III His laureate head right; border of dots. Rev. VIC-TORIA - AVGVSTI / S C Victory standing right, left foot set on helmet, writing on shield lying on her left knee; in right field, mourning Judea seated beneath palm tree; border of dots. Literature Cohen 625 BMC RE II, 126, 582 RIC II, 71, 468 BN 560 Hendin 1507 M.-M. Bendenoun, Coins of the Ancient World, A Portrait of the JDL Collection, Tradart, Genève, 2009, 55 (this coin). Condition Very rare and undoubtedly the finest specimen known of this very difficult and historically significant issue. A bold portrait and a wonderful enamel-like green patina. Extremely fine. Provenance Bank Leu AG 45, Zürich 1998, lot 319. Note Vespasian and Titus issued an impressive array of commemoratives for their victory in Judaea. One such type, the VICTORIA AVGVSTI SC sestertius offered here, adopts the familiar composition of Victory inscribing a shield which she attaches to a tree or a trophy. In this case it is to a palm tree, a clear enough reference to the Jewish War. On some variants there is no figure of Judaea at the base of the tree, and on others the inscription is truncated to VIC AVG SC or VICTORIA AVG SC. The type is perhaps the oldest in the Jewish War series, as it was introduced by Vespasian’s predecessor, Vitellius, on his sestertii of the Rome mint. On his coins the inscription and composition are identical to the present piece, though without the figure of Judaea. By the time Vitellius came to power the tide of the Jewish War had turned in favour of the Romans, making it possible to issue coins touting Rome’s success. His coins of this type cannot refer to his victories over Otho in the civil war since the Romans did not officially celebrate victories over fellow citizens, and the use of a palm tree made the distinction clear. Kraay has observed that this composition was also used by Vespasian for his rare sestertii inscribed DEVICTA IVDAEA SC, and, importantly, Carradice and Buttrey have documented three VICTORIA AVGVSTI SC sestertii of Vespasian (RIC II, pt. I, nos. 58, 127 and 217) struck with reverse dies originally used to produce coins of Vitellius. Also helping to prove the connection between the Judaea issues of Vitellius and Vespasian is the fact that Vitellius produced asses inscribed VICTOR AVGVSTI SC that show Victory alighting to the left, placing a shield on a trophy with Judaea seated at its base. This type also was adopted by Vespasian for his Jewish War commemorative series, sometimes with the expanded inscription VICTORIA AVGVSTI SC.

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Illyricum65

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HADRIAN, August 11, 117–July 10, 138. Sestertius, Rome 117, Æ 28.67 g. Obv. IMP CAES DIVI TRA PARTH F DIVI NER NEP TRAIANO HADRIANO AVG His laureate bust right, paludamentum on left shoulder; border of dots. Rev. PONT MAX TR POT COS / FORT RED / S C Fortuna seated left and holding rudder in right hand and cornucopia in left; border of dots. Literature Cohen - cf. 751 (paludamentum missing) BMC RE III, 399, 1111, pl. 76, 3 RIC II, 406, 541 Banti 408 E. Gabrici, “Bolsena. Scavi nel Sacellum della Nortia sul Pozzarello”, Monumenti Antichi 16, 1906, pp. 169–240 M.-M. Bendenoun, Coins of the Ancient World, A Portrait of the JDL Collection, Tradart, Genève, 2009, 58 (this coin). Condition A wonderful portrait and an unusual reddish-brown patina gently smoothed, otherwise extremely fine. Provenance Frank Sternberg AG, Zürich 1978, lot 518. P & P Santamaria, June 1950, lot 114. From the Magnaguti collection and the Bolsena hoard. Note The depiction of Fortuna Redux on this early sestertius of Hadrian is to be expected, for the new emperor was on the first leg of his overland journey from Antioch to Rome. Hadrian had been serving as governor of Syria in August, 117, when news arrived of Trajan’s severe illness and death in Cilicia. During this rapid sequence of events, Hadrian was assigned the rank of Caesar, then, perhaps two days later, was proclaimed heir to the throne. He was promptly hailed imperator by troops in Syria, and would consider August 11 as his dies imperii. The situation was unconventional, as Trajan was the first emperor to have died outside of Italy and rumors were rife that Hadrian’s selection as heir had been fabricated by the empress Plotina. Despite the support he enjoyed among the troops in the East, not everyone blindly accepted Hadrian’s promotion. When the dust settled, though, he was Rome’s new emperor. Hadrian’s first coinage in Rome as Augustus celebrated his adoption by Trajan, with the reverses solely devoted to his selection as Trajan’s successor. This initial issue was followed by a more general group of reverse types, echoing the ideas of piety, peace, concord, justice and his safe return to Rome. Though Trajan’s ashes were immediately escorted to Rome by ship, Hadrian remained in Syria, sending only a note to the senate requesting Trajan’s deification and seeking its pardon if he had acted too hastily in accepting the acclamation of the troops. There were many serious issues requiring his attention in the East, and sailing directly to Rome was out of the question. The most pressing tasks were the evacuation of Trajan’s most recent conquests in the Near East and the Lower Danube. Furthermore, there was civil unrest and rebellion in numerous places, notably across the Danube, where the commander Quadratus Bassus had died, possibly in battle. Perhaps in early October Hadrian began his journey northward from Syria, through Asia Minor. After wintering in Nicomedia or Byzantium (or elsewhere in the vicinity) he marched into the Balkans early in 118 to secure the region before continuing his journey overland to Rome, where he arrived on 9 July. Once there, he witnessed many acts of religious importance, including the sacrifice of seven beasts by the Arval Brethren in thanksgiving for the ‘auspicious advent’ that the reverse of this sestertius anticipates.

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ANTONINUS PIUS, July 10, 138–March 7, 161. Sestertius, Rome 144, Æ 27.05 g. Obv. ANTONINVS AVG PI-VS P P TR P COS III His laureate head right; border of dots. Rev. SA-LVS - AVG / S - C Salus standing left, feeding out of patera in right hand serpent coiled round lighted altar, and leaning left hand on long sceptre; border of dots. Literature Cohen 711 BMC RE IV, 208, 1303 RIC III, 111, 635a Banti 340 M.-M. Bendenoun, Coins of the Ancient World, A Portrait of the JDL Collection, Tradart, Genève, 2009, 61 (this coin). Condition A very elegant portrait and a delightful dark green patina. Extremely fine. Provenance Schweizerischer Kreditanstalt 5, Bern 1986, 419. Note To the extent that coin types are a reflection of imperial interests, we can assume there was a concern for the health of the emperor early in 144, when this sestertius was issued. The concern appears to have been reduced by the year’s end, but still lingered in the years immediately following. The inscription SALVS AVG (‘the health of the emperor’) and the image of Salus, the goddess of health, feeding from a patera a snake that rises from the flaming altar, reflect vows made on behalf of Pius’ well-being. It perhaps is no coincidence that in this same year a significant coinage was issued for the emperor’s principal heir, Marcus Aurelius, who is celebrated as ‘Princeps Iuventutis,’ the leader of young men being trained in the arts of war and peace. This emphasis on dynasty is reinforced in this year’s coinage with the celebration of Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius having been designated as the consuls of 145.

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Illyricum65

Questo mi ha colpito perchè è del III secolo, ovvero quando la qualità incisoria è in calo... e attira il mio sguardo ogni qual volta lo vedo sulla copertina dell'ultimo numero di Monete Antiche...

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TRAJAN DECIUS, September/October(?) 249–June 9/24, 251. Double sestertius, Rome, Æ 32.44 g. Obv. IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG His radiate and cuirassed bust right; border of dots. Rev. FELICITAS SAECVLI / S – C Felicitas standing facing, head left, leaning right hand on long caduceus and holding cornucopia in left; border of dots. Literature Cohen 39 RIC IV/3, 135, 115a Banti 9 Kent-Hirmer pl. 127, 462 (obverse) Sutherland 453–454 M.-M. Bendenoun, Coins of the Ancient World, A Portrait of the JDL Collection, Tradart, Genève, 2009, 83 (this coin). Condition Rare and undoubtedly the finest specimen known. An extraordinary portrait, possibly the finest on a coin of this period, work of a very skilled master engraver. A beautiful brown-reddish patina. Good extremely fine. Provenance Tradart Genève SA, Genève 1995, lot 222. Jean Vinchon Numismatique, Paris November 1994, lot 460 (illustrated on the back cover page). Bank Leu AG 22, Zürich 1979, lot 333. Monnnaies et Médailles SA 52, Basel 1975, lot 733. Monnnaies et Médailles SA 8, Basel 1949, lot 957. Note For an emperor who came to the throne through rebellion and inherited the overwhelming political, economic and military chaos of the age, it is remarkable that Trajan Decius had any interest in reforming the aes coinage. The brevity of his reign and the instability that followed the massacre of Decius’ army by the Goths assured there was no easy path for his reform to take root. But even if Decius had ruled for a lengthy period, it likely would have failed, for the integrity of the coinage continued its precipitous slide. Indeed, by the reign of Decius the intrinsic value of the double-denarius had fallen enough for it to be practical to strike new double-denarii over Severan denarii without concern for a perceived reduction in value. Like his immediate predecessors, Decius continued to strike the sestertius in large quantities and the dupondius and as on a modest scale. However, he expanded the repertoire of aes coinage with a double-sestertius and a small copper piece, usually called a semis, but which may have been a reduced-weight as. His other numismatic creation was a series of double-denarii portraying eleven of Rome’s deified emperors, from Augustus though Severus Alexander, which presumably was meant to celebrate the state religion, which included emperor worship. The novelty of the series – unparalleled by anything other than the ‘restored’ coinage of his adopted namesake, Trajan – seems a frivolous luxury in this difficult era. Perhaps even more interesting is his selection of emperors since, for example, he omits Claudius yet includes Commodus. Both choices defy explanation from a modern point of view, yet they likely reflected common opinion at the time.

E infine:

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MAXIMIANUS HERCULIUS, April 1, 286–c. July 310. Medallion, Rome 297–298, Æ 27.71 g. Obv. IMP C M AVR VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG His laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; linear border. Rev. MONETA AVGG Three Monetae standing facing, head left, holding balance in right hand and cornucopia in left; at their feet, three piles of coins; linear border. Literature Cohen - cf. 402 (A instead of AVR) W. Froehner, Les Médaillons de l’Empire Romain depuis le règne d’Auguste jusqu’à Priscus Attale, Paris, 1878, p. 264 F. Gnecchi, I medaglioni romani II, Milan, 1912,, pl. 126, 8 M.-M. Bendenoun, Coins of the Ancient World, A Portrait of the JDL Collection, Tradart, Genève, 2009, 88 (this coin). Condition Rare. A bold portrait of fine style, brown tone somewhat tooled on reverse, otherwise extremely fine. Provenance Monnnaies et Médailles SA 52, Basel 1975, lot 751. Glendining & Co., London 1950, lot 1988. Naville & Co. 8, Luzern 1924, lot 1455. From the Platt Hall and Bement collections. Note The obverse inscription on this medallion occurs only rarely and sporadically on billon coins, yet it was used with some consistency for gold. According to Depeyrot, it appears on gold coins at Ticinum, Siscia and Antioch in 286, and at Rome in both 286 and 287, which provides a good basis for dating this medallion of the Rome mint to c.286/7. With this narrow date-range, it is likely that this medallion was struck soon after Diocletian raised Maximian to the rank of Augustus on April 1, 286, and may even have been produced for that occasion. Since Maximian was then in command of the western provinces, medallions such as this would have been of great value in reinforcing the concept of the dyarchy to those residing in the capital. About this time Maximian and his colleague, Constantius, were trying to restore order in the many parts of Gaul that were being ravaged by bands of ex-soldiers and displaced peasants who had become loosely organised as the Bagaudae (‘the fighters’). Maximian had made only limited progress against them before, in the fall and winter of 285, the Burgundians, Alemanni, Chaibones, and Heruli crossed the Rhine in two great invasions of Gaul. In the midst of these crises, Maximian placed a capable man, Carausius, in charge of operations against Frankish and Saxon pirates in the English Channel. The outlook in the western provinces worsened considerably in 286. Just as Maximian was leading a brutal campaign against the Chaibones and Heruli near the mouth of the Rhine, Carausius revolted and established his own empire in Britain, and even captured some coastal areas in northwestern Gaul. Consequently, Diocletian raised Maximian to the rank of Augustus on April 1, recognising that the presence of an emperor was necessary in the West. By the fall of 286, Maximian had eliminated the Bagaudae and had started to gain the upper hand against the German invaders. He led sorties across the Rhine deep into German territory, racking up victories through the end of 287, when they were so numerous that he assumed the titles Germanicus maximus and Germanicus maximus II. However, the problems caused by the rebel state in Britain were not easily resolved, and for a decade they consumed much of the time and resources available to Maximian and Constantius.

Lascio spazio a commenti e giudizi...

Ciao

Illyricum

:)

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BiondoFlavio82

Questo mi ha colpito perchè è del III secolo, ovvero quando la qualità incisoria è in calo... e attira il mio sguardo ogni qual volta lo vedo sulla copertina dell'ultimo numero di Monete Antiche...

mmmhhh..., ne sei proprio convinto? mi permetto di dissentire, almeno per la ritrattistica della prima metà del secolo. Non nego che ci siano trasformazioni nel gusto e nello stile, ma parlarne in termini di calo mi richiama alla mente la trattatistica dell'800 o dei primi decenni del secolo scorso.

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Illyricum65
mmmhhh..., ne sei proprio convinto? mi permetto di dissentire, almeno per la prima metà del secolo.

Va beh... non tagliare il capello in quattro... diciamo " dalla seconda metà del III secolo" ? :D :D ?

Siamo proprio al limite! :D

Ciao

Illyricum

:)

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Guest Tugay Emin

@@Illyricum65 Bravo Illyricum, finalmente un po' di rilassamento in questi tuoi post. Visto il continuo stress dei falsi. Riempire gli occhi di tanto ben di Dio e la cosa migliore , postare monete (genuine) per dare maggiori informazioni a chi è nuovo ,o chi non ha grandi conoscenze e la cosa migliore. Complimenti.

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vickydog
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...Mi accodo col piacere distensivo...e le note in calce di NAC, poi...

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Illyricum65
... finalmente un po' di rilassamento in questi post ...

Questo era il secondo fine: dare visibilità a questi pregevoli esemplari e riuscire a farlo in modo conciliante e distensivo.

Aggiungo un link sui die-link dei doppi-sesterzi di Traiano Decio:

http://www.qblay.com/

dove potete dare uno sguardo d'insieme alla ritrattistica di questo imperatore, divisa per tipologia di busto (quello presentato è il TC -busto corazzato- e presenta 11 varianti):

http://www.qblay.com/DeciusDS/English/p2eDS.php

Ciao

Illyricum

:)

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dux-sab

vi state rilassando un po' troppo.

ecco un'altro capolavoro da artemide. che ne pensate?

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PS: aggiunta foto del rovescio (Illyricum)

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Oronzo

vi state rilassando un po' troppo.

ecco un'altro capolavoro da artemide. che ne pensate?

Dall'alto della mia inesperienza a me questo ritratto non mi convince completamente, non riesco a trovare corrispondenze sui miei libri e sulla rete per la tipologia del ritratto ma soprattutto per la troncatura del collo e l'annodatura dietro alla nuca dei lacci della corona laureata.

Avevo già chiesto lumi agli esperti del forum nella sezione riguardante l'asta di artemide.

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palpi62
Supporter

Altro sesterzio spettacolare di Nerva in vendita alla LANZ, il 9 dicembre

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vickydog
Supporter

Questo era il secondo fine: dare visibilità a questi pregevoli esemplari e riuscire a farlo in modo conciliante e distensivo.

...poi sai che mi fa piacere che hai portato monete non più in vendita, così l'aspetto estetico non viene turbato più di tanto dall'aspetto consumistico. Distensivo bis ;)

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Druso Galerio

Dall'alto della mia inesperienza a me questo ritratto non mi convince completamente, non riesco a trovare corrispondenze sui miei libri e sulla rete per la tipologia del ritratto ma soprattutto per la troncatura del collo e l'annodatura dietro alla nuca dei lacci della corona laureata.

Avevo già chiesto lumi agli esperti del forum nella sezione riguardante l'asta di artemide.

nemmeno a me convince, per quel poco che ne capisco il ritratto mi pare troppo moderno come fattura.

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dux-sab

Dall'alto della mia inesperienza a me questo ritratto non mi convince completamente, non riesco a trovare corrispondenze sui miei libri e sulla rete per la tipologia del ritratto ma soprattutto per la troncatura del collo e l'annodatura dietro alla nuca dei lacci della corona laureata.

Avevo già chiesto lumi agli esperti del forum nella sezione riguardante l'asta di artemide.

e cosa ti hanno risposto gli esperti? l'ho postato proprio perchè non convince neanche me.

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Oronzo

e cosa ti hanno risposto gli esperti? l'ho postato proprio perchè non convince neanche me.

non ho ricevuto risposta, ma avevo postato i miei dubbi solo ieri quando stavo seguendo l'asta live, moneta per la quale fra l'altro sono arrivati numerosi rilanci, penso sia finita a 1400 + diritti da una base di 500.

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cliff

Mah...gran bei pedigree non c'è dubbio. Riguardo alle monete ho già scritto come la penso nella discussione dell'asta. Avendole viste dal vivo posso dire che ce ne sono un paio notevoli, le altre diciamo che sono state presentate molto bene.

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Illyricum65

Ciao Cliff,

Avendole viste dal vivo posso dire che ce ne sono un paio notevoli, le altre diciamo che sono state presentate molto bene.

alludi a quelle dell'asta NAC o quelle dell'asta Artemide?

Ciao

Illyricum

:)

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cliff

Ciao Cliff,

alludi a quelle dell'asta NAC o quelle dell'asta Artemide?

Ciao

Illyricum

:)

A quelle dell'asta NAC.

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Oronzo

A quelle dell'asta NAC.

Ciao Cliff non voglio trascinarti su un argomento che non hai affrontato ma conoscendo la tua competenza mi piacerebbe avere anche il tuo parere sul sesterzio con il tempio di Giano passato da artemide.

Detto questo non vorrei sviare l'interesse dalla discussione sui bellissimi sesterzi postati da Illyricum fra i quali a mio parere l Agrippina e' veramente da perderci la testa....:)

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Illyricum65

Ciao Cliff,

... quelle dell'asta NAC...
... Avendole viste dal vivo posso dire che ce ne sono un paio notevoli, le altre diciamo che sono state presentate molto bene.

quindi affermi per visione diretta la bontà di alcune mentre altre sarebbero "aiutate" oppure semplicemente "filtrate" come foto...

Giusto?

Illyricum

:)

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BiondoFlavio82
«The collection of ancient coins presented here clearly reflects a very persevering and exclusive quest for beauty. It tolerates only the best examples, evenly divided across the time and space of a thousand years of Greco-Roman civilization. A desire to cover that entire civilization by assembling a representative series of miniature masterpieces is at work here, as is an interest in history; but a considered look at the collection unveiled in this catalogue reveals the clear predominance of an aesthetic quest for quality.»
c'è poco da dire... io e il collezionista della Tradart abbiamo gusti molto differenti...
Modificato da BiondoFlavio82

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cliff

Ciao Cliff,

quindi affermi per visione diretta la bontà di alcune mentre altre sarebbero "aiutate" oppure semplicemente "filtrate" come foto...

Giusto?

Illyricum

:)

Dico che presentate in quel modo la gente alla fine acquista una storia e un pedigree, finendo per scordarsi di osservare bene la moneta, che deve essere a quel punto obbligatoriamente eccezionale se e' finita in una tale collezione.

Accanto a monete eccezionali come l'Agrippina (un lato almeno, l'altro mica tanto) e il dupondio trionfale di Augusto (moneta comunque quasi nera in realta' e con piccoli segni di pulitura nei campi, diciamo fotografata molto bene) ce n'erano altre un po' piu' problematiche.

Ad esempio il sesterzio di Nerone aveva un grosso cratere da cancro curato in mezzo ai capelli che prendeva mezza testa, parzialmente occultato ma comunque macroscopicamente visibile dal vivo. Inoltre il verde del dritto era per me artificiale, si vede il metallo nudo occhieggiare alla base del busto, sulla guancia e tra le lettere per cui credo che il dritto fosse originariamente simile in colore al rovescio.

Questo solo per parlare di una moneta ma ce ne sarebbe da dire anche sulle altre (l' Adriano e il Massimiano ad esempio, ma non solo loro...Anche il Vespasiano verde aveva i suoi problemini..).

Questo per dire che le monete stesse, in certi contesti, contano fino a un certo punto.

Modificato da cliff
  • Mi piace 1

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cliff

Ciao Cliff non voglio trascinarti su un argomento che non hai affrontato ma conoscendo la tua competenza mi piacerebbe avere anche il tuo parere sul sesterzio con il tempio di Giano passato da artemide.

Detto questo non vorrei sviare l'interesse dalla discussione sui bellissimi sesterzi postati da Illyricum fra i quali a mio parere l Agrippina e' veramente da perderci la testa.... :)

Moneta che sarebbe stata da visionare dal vivo e in particolare il bordo. Comunque da una visione da foto non vedo particolari che mi fanno pensare ad un falso, tutt'al piu' la moneta non mi sembra del tutto stabilizzata e ancora a rischio cancro.

  • Mi piace 1

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Illyricum65

Ciao Cliff,

di seguito posto alcune foto a confronto NAC/Tradart ...

Nerone

post-3754-0-26783200-1385982974_thumb.jp

post-3754-0-54029700-1385983004_thumb.jp

(sono d'accordo sui dubbi sulla patina. Non scorgo, non avendo avuto la visione diretta della moneta, i residui della stuccatura sulla testa

Vespasiano

post-3754-0-95445800-1385983033_thumb.jp

post-3754-0-72753800-1385983052_thumb.jp

(La strepitosa patina verde anche qui è quantomeno sospetta. Lle depressioni attorno alle lettere del rovescio sono testimonianze di una bulinatura delle stesse eseguita in modo grossolano?)

Adriano

post-3754-0-32341500-1385983250_thumb.jp

post-3754-0-22935600-1385983264_thumb.jp

(Questa la posto più che altro a scopo didattico per i neofiti per evidenziare la differenza che comporta l'utilizzo di filtri e di ombreggiatura sulle foto - ma vedi anche sopra)

Resto comunque personalmente dell'avviso che si tratta di monete restaurate più o meno profondamente ma non stravolte nella loro essenza e nell'insieme godibili. Unico problema, già più volte segnalato: andrebbe descritto che è stato eseguito un intervento.

Anche perchè ripongo fiducia in quanto descritto da Cliff mentre Tradart riporta per Nerone

Condition
A bold portrait and a finely detailed reverse composition,
green patina. About extremely fine.

Il tutto detto con molto equilibrio ... zen. Ohm...

post-3754-0-12988800-1385983634_thumb.jp

Ciao

Illyricum

:)

Modificato da Illyricum65

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