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YV_ laMoneta

Original stamp of the XIX century.

33 risposte in questa discussione

Canceled stamp obverse half dollar in 1870.

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All coins with the presence of metal between the teeth - fake (example → in the picture below).

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Inviato (modificato)

So the world is full of fools who spend a lot of money for fakes?

Just to say, I don't know you and you might be the most brilliant numismatist at the world, but I suppose someone else would have some doubts apart from you if what you're saying is correct.. Everytime you see a little failure in mintage, you directly conclude it's a fake coin..this look a bit paranoid to me..

So, as I am a beginner and you're starting to make me paranoid too, is there someone else who can confirm that what is being said here is true? Just to understand, as these posts remain as a permanent truth in the forum and no one says anything..

Thank you.

Modificato da pedro_88

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Inviato (modificato)

Everything is very simple.

 

In any genuine coin no metal between the "teeth" → look carefully authentic picture of the stamp of the XIX century.

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post-35516-0-44257900-1452589644_thumb.j

Modificato da YV_ laMoneta

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Inviato (modificato)

Compare the character design of the space of two coins 1894 and 1895 between the "teeth".

 

There are willing to show another sign of the lack of authenticity of the coins from the post №3?

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Modificato da YV_ laMoneta

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But..what you call "fessura" in post #7 is a "stair", and it's not present where you say "divario è assente" due to circulation..it's just worn.. Isn't it?

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But..what you call "fessura" in post #7 is a "stair", and it's not present where you say "divario è assente" due to circulation..it's just worn.. Isn't it?

not understood

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Inviato (modificato)

Isn't the difference simply due to the fact that one coin is UNC and the other one is circulated (so that the metal in word on the edge)?

post-44504-0-69427600-1452950957.png

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Modificato da pedro_88
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Isn't the difference simply due to the fact that one coin is UNC and the other one is circulated (so that the metal in word on the edge)?

In any state of the coin crack at genuine coin, and there can not be.

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Inviato (modificato)

Everything is very simple.

 

In any genuine coin no metal between the "teeth" → look carefully authentic picture of the stamp of the XIX century.

Another example "1847 25C :confused: PR66 NGC :confused: . Briggs 8 E.... Proof Seated Quarters   Lot  3197   Heritage Auctions

 

http://coins.ha.com/itm/proof-seated-quarters/1847-25c-pr66-ngc-briggs-8-e/a/1225-3197.s?ctrack=2718902&type=featured-2--coin--open-1225--tem100815

 

ab8dffa7dde1e6208b3da9b38f2b3665b9131623

Modificato da YV_ laMoneta

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Addition:

 

b9fe8e2c00e17e152fa789fd563163f7b9131623

This, unfortunately, is really a beginner's mistake--please don't be offended, because I'm sure this is a coinage not your own--but you're using a circulation strike of one year to draw highly tendentious conclusions about a proof strike from another year.

 

The 1894s proof dime is one of the most talked about and intensely studied coins in American numismatics, and I feel certain that the discipline has by now a good handle on these coins. (Finding one of the dozen or so missing examples is still a boyhood dream for many of us, but even us small-timers know to watch out for added "S" Philly coins, and the converted New Orleans' pieces!)

 

:) v.

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This, unfortunately, is really a beginner's mistake...

There is no mistake here.

There rude forgery, understandable to any primary school students.

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There is no mistake here.

There rude forgery, understandable to any primary school students.

Per cortesia cerchiamo di evitare messaggi potenzialmente offensivi, verso un utente che ha espresso una sua opinione più che legittima in termini di assoluta correttezza...grazie.

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I’m sorry, YV_laMoneta. I should have used a softer approach. My bad.

 

-----------------------------------------------------

 

Please let me explain what I think is going on with the rims and denticles on several of the coins you are labeling “fake.”

 

Flow lines. Back in my geekier days it was fun for me to look at the lines in uncirculated coins left by die polishing and by “metal flow” (which, as you know, is what happens under the heat and pressure of the moment of striking).

 

That moving metal must go somewhere. A good illustration of the phenomenon is provided by “broadstruck” coins (http://www.coinsgb.com/Error_Coins/Broadstrike.html ), that is coins that have been struck without a collar.

 

What I beg you to understand is that even with a collar, the moving metal must still find a destination. And even if too much metal is attempting to move—say, because of denticles that are too big or too closely spaced—then in that final instant of striking, the excess metal will be deposited…somewhere. I vote for between the denticles!

 

That, anyway, is what I think was going on.

 

;) v.

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Sorry, villa66, but your interpretation of the minting process shown me "coin" absolutely not true.

 

1. ALL of these coins were minted in the ring.

 

2. Metal Working there is no way to flow between the "teeth" in a closed space between the upper, lower die and the ring (see. Picture).

 

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But your illustration is a cross-section of the dies and collar at their maximum impact on the planchet. The dies withdraw from the planchet in the next millisecond, and in my mind, that is when the depositing of the extra metal occurs.

 

Note--in the examples you provide--the seeming different texture of the metal between the denticles. It looks like slag, as opposed to the smooth surfaces left by contact with the dies.

 

:) v.

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Sorry but I think it's impossible to talk and try to advance in a reasoning when the interlocutor doesn't interacts with you but keeps exposing its theories by itself, not considering what the others say/ask. I'm trying to understand your point of view, and I did it I think, but if you just keep showing pictures of UNC vs circulated coins and keep repeating always the same sentence, there's no way out.. And I don't think it to be just a problem of translation between different languages, with all due respect.

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Vedere. Post # 1 e l'immagine qui sotto.

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Inviato (modificato)

This line is even here, look! But as the coin is worn, the higher part of the edge is gone.. So this is a fake too? You showed it as a genuine coin, in post #7.. Tell me, can you see the line or not?

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Modificato da pedro_88

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Apart from this, villa explained in post #17 what creates the filling between the denticles you are showing, I think it's credible enough, don't you?

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This line is even here, look! But as the coin is worn, the higher part of the edge is gone.. So this is a fake too? You showed it as a genuine coin, in post #7.. Tell me, can you see the line or not?

post-35516-0-23272700-1453972374_thumb.j

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