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Una particolare frazione achemenide


Matteo91
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Questa monetina dell'Impero achemenide è piuttosto particolare: non mi era mai capitato di vedere il re rivolto a sinistra e credo sia, infatti, una vera rarità. Nella descrizione è citata l'esistenza di un altro esemplare esitato da CNG nel 2001 (asta 58, lotto 725). 

Ho pensato potesse essere interessante da condividere. Qualcuno riesce a reperire l'immagine dell'altro esemplare noto?

Saluti,
Matteo.

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Achaemenid Persian Empire. 1/12 Siglos; Achaemenid Persian Empire; c. 500-475 BC, Siglos, 4.33g. Obv: Persian king in kneeling-running stance l., drawing bow. Rx: Incuse punch. Unpublished with left-facing king, but cf. CNG 58, 19 September 2001, lot 725, for another example from a different obverse die. The CNG cataloguer described their coin as fourrée; the low weight of the present example indicates that it may be plated as well, although visual examination reveals no evidence of a base metal core.Extremely unusual with left facing kneeling, running king.

Edited by Matteo91
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E' vero: è particolare. In genere il pezzo da 1/12 di siclo il re è rivolto a destra come su questo esemplare:

Pegasi Numismatics, Auction XXVIII, LOTTO 229 DEL 29/05/2013

PERSIAN EMPIRE. Darius I, 510-486 BC. AR 1/12 Siglos (0.40 gm). King kneeling, drawing bow / Incuse square. SNG.Kayhan.1028. Klein.757. Winzer.1.9. Toned VF. Rare early issue [Est. $450]

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Edited by King John
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Credo però che ci sia un errore nell'indicazione del peso della frazione di siclo postata da @Matteo91 : si parla di 4,33 grammi e invece dovrebbe essere di circa 0,40 grammi come il pezzo da me allegato nel post precedente: infatti 5,30 circa (peso di un siclo) : 12 = 0,44 g (peso corretto di 1/12 di siclo).

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@King John hai ragione, É sicuramente un errore. Non lo avevo notato.

In tutte queste monete, anche nelle frazioni più piccole, il gran re É rivolto sempre a destra. Domani cercherò con più calma l'altro esemplare noto con il re rivolto a sinistra.

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  • 6 months later...

A distanza di mesi, ecco una nuova interessante frazione achemenide.

Dalla Saint Paul 5, lotto 177, aggiudicata per 40GBP.

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Persia, Achaemenid Empire. temp. Artaxerxes II to Artaxerxes III, early-mid 4th cenutry BC. AR Tetartemorion (4mm, 0.17g). Mylasa mint(?). Head of the Persian Great King l. R/ Stellate pattern of Milesian style. Cf. CNG E-343, lot 191 and E-356, lot 235; otherwise unpublished in the standard references. Very Rare, VF

 

L'aspetto interessante, almeno per me, è la presenza del rovescio identico al rovescio dei ben più comuni dioboli di Mileto. 

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Altre monete analoghe:

CNG 343, lotto 191

592c6941cb7ba_343191.jpg.67d08f866e5cbfa138417139b5e15116.jpg


343, Lot: 191. Estimate $100.
Sold for $475. This amount does not include the buyer’s fee.    

CARIA, Achaemenid Period. Early-mid 4th cenutry BC. AR Tetartemorion(?) (6mm, 0.21 g). Mylasa mint(?). Head of the Persian Great King left / Stellate pattern of Milesian style. Unpublished in the standard references. VF, porous. Extremely rare.

The stellate pattern on this issue is undoubtedly that which was used on various coins struck at Miletos from the 6th-4th centuries BC. It is most often seen on the city’s ubiquitous archaic silver fractions that featured a lion forepart on the obverse. In 494 BC, Miletos was destroyed and subsequently occupied by the Persians, in response to their participation in the Ionian Revolt. This event seems to mark the end of the massive archaic coinage, although it may have been revived for very limited issues in the 5th century (cf. SNG Kayhan 483–7). Nonetheless, there probably was no civic coinage during the few years that the Persians controlled the city before losing it to the Delian League in 478 BC. With the exception of the limited silver issues of the 5th century, and an emission of bronze with the same lion forepart/stellate pattern type in the early 4th century (cf. SNG Kayhan 488–9), there was no major output of coinage from the city until mid 4th century when the city debuted it’s new reverse type featuring a lion standing left, with its head reverted. Thus, it is unlikely that this coin was part of a Persian-related issue at Miletos. In the early 4th century, however, the Milesian stellate pattern reverse was revived in the fractional coinage of the Hekatomnid satraps of Caria that were struck at Mylasa (some references place these issues at Miletos, but that is likely incorrect; see Konuk, Identities, p. 103). These coins used the Milesian weight standard, which is likely the reason for their revival of that particular stellate type. There are a variety of issues from Caria during the Persian period that used Persian iconography, so it is likely that this coin belongs among these issues, and perhaps was struck under the Hekatomnids at Mylasa.

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CNG 356, lotto 235

592c69a29e583_356235.jpg.0eb19d97f2f03c149e04135ad307d91b.jpg


356, Lot: 235. Estimate $100.
Sold for $170. This amount does not include the buyer’s fee.    

PERSIA, Achaemenid Empire. temp. Artaxerxes II to Artaxerxes III. Early-mid 4th cenutry BC. AR Tetartemorion(?) (5mm, 0.10 g). Mylasa mint(?). Head of the Persian Great King left / Stellate pattern of Milesian style. Cf. CNG E-343, lot 191; otherwise unpublished in the standard references. Near VF, toned, light porosity. Extremely rare.
 

[Descrizione identica a quella del precedente post]

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