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Atena con spighe


gpittini
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DE GREGE EPICURI

Finalmente qualche nuova provinciale! Questa in realtà è arrivata già a Verona (da Tinia): una dracma di Alessandria bella pesante (23,8 g.)  e grossa (35 mm), certo non in conservazione ottimale; è di Adriano, e non ha il solito rovescio col Nilo (il più comune), ma una Atena, o Minerva che dir si voglia, in piedi a sinistra, con 2 spighe in mano: insolito attributo per questa dea. Dovrebbe essere: Dattari, 1627. E' incredibile il prezzo cui sono arrivate oggi queste dracme, se sono in miglior conservazione.

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Edited by gpittini
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Bellissima, queste dracme mi fanno impazzire. Concordo sul discorso dei prezzi, sono davvero alti non appena i pezzi raggiungono conservazioni un minimo buone. Mi piacerebbe impostare un filone dedicato ad Alessandria, sto anche cercando il Dattari, purtroppo il mio portafogli non mi permette di andare oltre al semplice desiderio :(

Per rimanere in tema:

 

Edited by Afranio_Burro
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Ciao

 Alessandria e Egitto in generale è una mia passione da molto tempo, come detto da Gianfranco trovare dracme o bronzi in generale ben conservati è difficile, anche perché hanno circolato bel otre il loro periodo storico, interessava solo il metallo non l'effige. Vi posto una dracma di Adriano ancora in buone condizioni e se poi vi interessa posso continuare con altre non così ben conservate.

Silvio 

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dracma r801.jpg

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@gpittini bel pezzo! In condizioni ottimali una variante molto simile (Atena ha in aggiunta la lancia) costa anche 2.400 dollari!!!!

Ira & Larry Goldberg Coins & Collectibles, Inc.


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Auction Lot Date Estimate Hammer
Auction 46 - The Millennia Collection 106 (« | ») 26. May 2008 * (premium account) * (premium account)

 

Roman Egypt. Hadrian, 117-138 AD. AE Drachm (29.57 g), Alexandria. Dated Year 17 (132/133 AD). Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Hadrian right. Reverse: Athena stands left, in peplos and aegis, holding out two ears of corn, other hand holding spear, against which shield leans; date across field. Milne 1359; Emmett, Alexandrian Coins, no. 921 (only 1 example known). Handsome, finely centered strike, with only minor peripheral flatness -- mostly limited to reverse. Lovely variegated red and brown patina, with touches of green. Overall, exceptional for series. Rare. NGC graded Extremely Fine. .
This coin's unusual image of Athena / Minerva displaying an association with one of the various grain-fertility goddesses by holding up ears of "corn" (actually a British misnomer perpetrated in historical literature; "corn" was instead a grain like barley or wheat, or emmer), is one not often encountered in her iconography. The implication suggested, because Athena was both a goddess of wisdom and war, that prudent management and force of arms, if needed, went hand in hand with the prosperity and strength (from nourishment) represented by the corn. However, for this Egyptian coin, like Egypt itself in the panorama of ancient Rome and its territories, it can be seen that the unusual was more often the norm.
As Rome was absorbing conquered territories into its domain, in the Near East especially, Augustus initially allowed the rulers of the conquered peoples (often called subject kings) to remain in power and deal with their own lands. Eventually local squabbles, often over royal succession, would lead to the rulers to be replaced by Roman governors, and the countries then incorporated into Rome's provinces. While the provinces as a whole were regarded as territory of the Roman state, generally those lands, property, or holdings of the former rulers became the Roman emperor's personal property.
After his conquest of Egypt, Augustus, had personally seized the vast accumulated treasure of the Egyptian Ptolemies, which had accrued uninterrupted for over two and a half centuries, up through the reign of Cleopatra VII, the last of the line. In addition, Augustus also took over the immense ongoing income of Egypt, resulting from its normal daily course of production and manufacturing, trade, taxes, etc. As a result of Rome's intermittent civil wars since Julius Caesar's assassination, the city's treasury was nearly empty. To replenish this loss, Augustus contributed large amounts of his own income to the treasury, aided and abetted expansively by the newly received wealth of Egypt (This public-spirited "generosity" of course being carefully recorded in his public memoirs, for all the propaganda value that it was worth -- but he did finally manage to balance Rome's budget, among other benefits.) As a result and a necessity for a secure royal income, Augustus kept Egypt as a personal property. All subsequent Roman emperors maintained this tradition. Thus the economic status of Egypt could be compared to the socialist state of today, but with its industries nationalized for the benefit of the Imperial Throne in far-off Rome.
Another reason, and perhaps the most important, for maintaining this status quo was that Egypt was to become the most reliable source of food for Italy, and especially Rome itself -- Rome's supply of "corn" was a main factor of its economy and its survival. It was also because of Egypt's impressive agricultural productivity that it proved to be a vital prop in maintaining an important aspect of the socio-political tradition of inter-class patronage that had evolved during Rome's Republican period. This was the "dole" -- directed mainly to the lower class citizens, and somewhat like a welfare program (termed annona). This program had evolved in the previous century as a means of supplying grain to Roman citizens at favorable government-subsidized prices. By 58 BC, the policy had become free grain (and later, ready-made bread). By the time of Augustus, this dole was providing free food for over some 200,000 Romans; Julius Caesar had gotten the numbers down to 150,000 a quarter of a century earlier but the numbers had climbed once again. Augustus, as emperor, paid the cost of this dole out of his own pocket, as well as the cost of games for entertainment (thus: panem et circenses, "bread and circuses," the famous phrase coined by the Roman poet Juvenal).
Payment for the latter came principally from his personal holdings in Egypt. Augustus eventually restricted the number of beneficiaries to a maximum of 200,000 male citizens. Later a portion of this supply was also set aside to feed the soldiers, primarily the Praetorian Guard, who protected the emperor. Thus the maintenance of this supply was critical to a substantial portion of the Roman citizenry's survival. And even more so, the uninterrupted flow of grain from Egypt to Rome was an important base of power for the emperor. Therefore, it behooved all Roman emperors to maintain Egypt as their preserve with diligence and care. The distribution of free grain or bread in Rome remained in effect until the end of the Empire. Other later emperors added on occasion free pork and wine. Eventually, other major cities of the Empire also began providing similar benefits. But again, the dole and free rations were limited to specific numbers of recipients. The vast bulk of the Empire's grain supply was distributed through a free market system comparable to that seen today.
Estimated Value $2,000 - 2,400.
Edited by King John
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25 minuti fa, Matteo91 dice:

Di recente c'è stata una vendita abbastanza consistente di queste dramme alessandrine...Vi ricordate per caso quale fosse? 

Se non intervengono prima, te lo dico appena apro il pc visto che me la ero segnata :)

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25 minuti fa, Matteo91 dice:

Di recente c'è stata una vendita abbastanza consistente di queste dramme alessandrine...Vi ricordate per caso quale fosse? 

Credo che tu ti riferisca alla recente Naville 27, che aveva lotti ex collezione Dattari.

Anche l'asta Naville 28 in corso ha pezzi ex Dattari.

Ciao

ES

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31 minuti fa, Matteo91 dice:

Di recente c'è stata una vendita abbastanza consistente di queste dramme alessandrine...Vi ricordate per caso quale fosse? 

Credo che tu ti riferisca alla recente Naville 27, che aveva lotti ex collezione Dattari.

Anche l'asta Naville 28 in corso ha pezzi ex Dattari.

Ciao

ES

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6 minuti fa, Emilio Siculo dice:

Credo che tu ti riferisca alla recente Naville 27, che aveva lotti ex collezione Dattari.

Anche l'asta Naville 28 in corso ha pezzi ex Dattari.

Ciao

ES

Grazie, è proprio quella :)

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1 minuto fa, Matteo91 dice:

Grazie, è proprio quella :)

Alcuni pezzi hanno fatto realizzi veramente notevoli...

È una monetazione che contiene temi sicuramente interessante, come testimonia questa discussione.

ES

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Concordo ormai i prezzi sono alle stelle, io ho smesso di comprare causa poca moneta.

Gianfranco, potrebbe trattarsi anche della 1678 la differenza è nella disposizione delle le lettere in campo. la 77 ha LI è Z a dx mentre la 78 LI Z sono tutte a dx.

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Il 15/1/2017 at 16:02, Afranio_Burro dice:

.... Mi piacerebbe impostare un filone dedicato ad Alessandria, sto anche cercando il Dattari, purtroppo il mio portafogli non mi permette di andare oltre al semplice desiderio :(

Per rimanere in tema:

 

Buongiorno,

forse lo sa già, ma volendo il Dattari è disponibile on-line in formato pdf

Parte 1 http://www.cealex.org/sitecealex/diffusion/etud_anc_alex/LVR_000011_I_w.pdf

Parte 2 http://www.cealex.org/sitecealex/diffusion/etud_anc_alex/LVR_000011_II_w.pdf

Saluti

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4 ore fa, cipa dice:

Buongiorno,

forse lo sa già, ma volendo il Dattari è disponibile on-line in formato pdf

Parte 1 http://www.cealex.org/sitecealex/diffusion/etud_anc_alex/LVR_000011_I_w.pdf

Parte 2 http://www.cealex.org/sitecealex/diffusion/etud_anc_alex/LVR_000011_II_w.pdf

Saluti

Grazie della segnalazione utile e preziosa. 

Continuerò comunque a cercare il cartaceo (senza fretta visto che le monete alessandrine non sono il mio principale ambito di interesse), perché più bello, comodo e meno dannoso per gli occhi ;) 

Edited by Afranio_Burro
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