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ARES III

Israele: trovata una fortezza che aiuterà a ricostruire eventi biblici

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Israele: trovata una fortezza che aiuterà a ricostruire eventi biblici

Si tratta di una struttura in buono stato di conservazione e dunque sarà aperta al pubblico nei prossimi giorni

Il Medio Oriente, e in particolare il suo sottosuolo, continua a riservare scoperte sorprendenti. Una fortezza di 3200 anni fa utilizzata dai canaanei per fronteggiare gli attacchi di filistei, da un lato, e di israeliti, dall’altro, è tornata alla luce grazie ad un gruppo di archeologi israeliani , che l’hanno scoperta nei pressi della località di Kiryat Gat, nelle vicinanze della storica Lakish. Si tratta di una struttura in buono stato di conservazione e dunque sarà aperta al pubblico nei prossimi giorni. Lo ha reso noto la Autorità israeliana per le antichità.

La fortezza di circa 20 metri quadrati – che aveva torri di guardia – era situata su una elevazione strategica da dove si controllava il transito su una arteria di collegamento fra la fascia costiera (dove si trovavano gli insediamenti filistei di Ashkelon, Ashdod e Gat) ed il deserto di Giudea, nei pressi del quale vi era invece la presenza di israeliti. Nei locali sono stati rinvenuti utensili dell’epoca, per lo più di fattura egizia. “Questa fortezza – hanno commentato gli archeologi Saar Ganor e Itamar Weissbein – ci consente di dare un’occhiata ravvicinata ad eventi descritti nella Bibbia nel Libro dei Giudici, ed in particolare alle lotte infuriate quando la terra di Canaan era ancora sotto dominio egizio”.

http://www.meteoweb.eu/2020/08/scoperta-archeologia-israele-fortezza/1469818/

 

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Canaanite Fortress from Judges’ Era Uncovered in Excavations near Kiryat Gat

A Canaanite fortress from the middle of the 12th century BCE (the days of the biblical judges), was unearthed in an excavation of the Israel Antiquities Authority and volunteer youths near Kibbutz Galon outside Kiryat Gat,some 50 miles south of Tel Aviv.

The size of the fortress is 60 × 60 ft. and it includes towers at the four corners. A huge threshold was preserved at the entrance to the structure, hewn from a single stone weighing about 3 tons.

Inside the citadel was a courtyard paved with stone slabs which had pillars in the center. Rooms were arranged on either side of the courtyard. Hundreds of pottery vessels, some of them intact, including special vessels such as a bowl and a cup, which were probably used for worship, and a large number of bowls, were exposed in the fort’s rooms. Some of the bowls were made in a style that imitated Egyptian bowls.

The remains of the citadel were uncovered with the help of students from the Eretz Israel Dept. at the multidisciplinary school in Beer Sheva, students from the Nachshon pre-military preparatory school, and many volunteers. This is part of the Antiquities Authority’s policy to bring the general public, in particular the younger generation, closer to the archeology of their homeland.

According to archaeologists Saar Ganor and Itamar Weisbain of the IAA, “the fortress we discovered provides a glimpse into the geopolitical reality described in the Book of Judges, in which the Canaanites, the Israelites and the Philistines struggle against one another. During this time, the land of Canaan was ruled by the Egyptians, and its inhabitants were their subjects. But then, during the 12th century BCE, two new major players appeared in the region: the Israelites and the Philistines, thus began a series of bloody territorial struggles.”

The Israelites settled in unfortified communities on the central mountain ridge, while the Philistines gained great power in the southern coastal plain where they established large cities in Ashdod, Ashkelon, Ekron and Gat,” the two researchers continued. “In an attempt to occupy more territory, the Philistines confronted the Egyptians and the Canaanites on the border, which presumably stretched between the Philistine kingdom of Gat and the Canaanite kingdom of Lachish in Nahal Guvrin.”

Ganor Weisbein added that “the stories of the judges in the Bible clearly illustrate the complex geopolitical reality and the struggle for territorial control, during the realignment of the political forces in the Land of Israel. The layout of the citadel is known from other sites which were excavated in the country, and identified as Egyptian ‘governor’s houses.’ The fortress was built in a strategic location, from which it was possible to view the main road that passed along Nahal Guvrin – a road that connected the coastal plain to the Judaean plain.”

Talila Lifshitz, Director of the Community and Forest Department in the Southern Region of the Jewish National Fund said: “Gal-on Fortress provides a fascinating glimpse into the story of a relatively unknown period in the country’s history, and is a tourist and experiential attraction for visitors. The fortress is located in the Guvrin Forest and was prepared for access to the general public together with the southern district of the Jewish National Fund. A parking lot and explanatory signs have been set up there to enhance the archeological experience in nature and in the forests.”

https://www.jewishpress.com/news/religion/canaanite-fortress-from-judges-era-uncovered-in-excavations-near-kiryat-gat/2020/08/23/

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3,200-year-old fort, site of epic battles in biblical era, found in south Israel

Israel Antiquities Authority says remains of Egyptian citadel, built to repel Philistines while Israelites settled elsewhere in the country, will be opened to public free of charge

A 3,200-year-old Canaanite citadel where epic battles were fought during biblical times has been unearthed near the southern Israeli city of Kiryat Gat, the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) announced Sunday.

The 12th century BCE fort next to Kibbutz Gal On and the Guvrin Stream, some 70 kilometers (40 miles) south of Jerusalem, was built by the Egyptians, who ruled the area at the time, as a defense against the Philistines, in an era corresponding to the period of the biblical Book of Judges, the IAA said in a statement.

The citadel was eventually abandoned by the Egyptians, leading to the destruction of many Canaanite cities, probably at the hands of the Philistines.

According to IAA archaeologists, Saar Ganor and Itamar Weissbein, the structure that was unearthed is 18 meters (59 feet) long and 18 meters wide, with towers in its four corners for a lookout.

They said a huge doorstep has been preserved that was carved out of a single rock weighing 3 tons.

Inside is a yard with brick paving and columns, flanked by rooms. Hundreds of pieces of earthenware were discovered in the rooms, some of them whole, including many bowls produced in an Egyptian style. One bowl and a mug were likely used for worship, the archaeologists said.

The citadel we discovered offers a glimpse into the geopolitical reality described in the Book of Judges, where the Canaanites, Israelites and Philistines battle each other,” Ganor and Weissbein were quoted as saying in the statement.

“At the time, the Land of Canaan was ruled by the Egyptians, and its residents were their proteges,” they said. “But then, during the 12th century BCE, two central players appeared in the area: the Israelites and the Philistines. And thus began a series of bloody territorial struggles.

The Israelites settled in unfortified communities on the central mountain ridge, while the Philistines gained power in the southern Mediterranean coast,” they added. “Trying to conquer more land, the Philistines battled the Egyptians and the Canaanites on the border, which likely passed along the Guvrin Stream between the Philistine kingdom of Gat and the Canaanite kingdom of Lachish.”

The Gal On Citadel was seemingly built as part of a Canaanite-Egyptian attempt to deal with the new geopolitical situation.

“The citadel was built in a strategic spot, overlooking the main road along Guvrin Stream — a road that linked the coast to the Judean lowlands.”

According to the statement, similar Egyptian fortresses from the same period have been discovered elsewhere in Israel.

The citadel was found in excavations carried out by schoolchildren from Beersheba, students of the Nahshon pre-military academy and many more volunteers.

The site will be opened to the public in a ceremony on Tuesday in collaboration with KKL-JNF. Visits will be free of charge.

https://www.timesofisrael.com/3200-year-old-fort-site-of-epic-battles-in-biblical-era-found-in-south-israel/amp/

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A fortress from the time of the judges was discovered near Kiryat Gat – Israel News

The Canaanite fortress that was exposedAerial photo: Emil Aljem IAA

A Canaanite fortress from the middle of the 12th century BC, the biblical period of the Judges, was unearthed in the excavations of the Israel Antiquities Authority and youths near Kibbutz Galon near Kiryat Gat.

The site in the Guvrin Forest is currently being opened for a free public visit, in cooperation with the Israel Antiquities Authority and the Jewish National Fund.

According to archaeologists Saar Ganor and Itamar Weisbain of the Israel Antiquities Authority, “The fortress we discovered provides a glimpse into the geopolitical reality described in the Book of Judges, in which the Canaanites, Israelis and Philistines fought each other. 12, two other major players appeared in the area: the Israelis and the Philistines, thus beginning a series of bloody territorial struggles.The Israelites settled in unfortified settlements on the main mountain boulevard, and the Philistines, for their part, gained much power in the southern coastal plain and established large cities in Ashdod “In principle, in an attempt to occupy additional territories, the Philistines clashed with the Egyptians and the Canaanites on the border line, which apparently passed between the Philistine kingdom of Gath and the Canaanite Lachish kingdom in Nahal Guvrin.”

“It seems that Gal-On Fortress was built out of a Canaanite / Egyptian attempt to deal with the new geopolitical situation. However, in the middle of the 12th century BC, the Egyptians abandoned Canaan, and returned to Egypt. “Their departure led to the enormous destruction of the Canaanite cities that were left without protection – a destruction for which the Philistines are apparently responsible,” they added.

According to Ganor Weissbein, “The stories of the judges in the Bible clearly illustrate the complex geopolitical reality and the struggle for control, in the reorganization of the political forces in Eretz Israel. The fortress plan is known from other sites excavated in the country, and identified as Egyptian ‘governors’ houses. “From there you could watch the main road that passed along Nahal Guvrin – a road that connected the coastal plain to the Judean plain.”

The two note that the size of the fortress is 18 × 18 m and there are towers at the four corners. At the entrance to the building, a huge entrance threshold was preserved, hewn from a single stone weighing about 3 tons. Inside the citadel was a courtyard paved with stone slabs and pillars in the center. Rooms were arranged on both sides of the courtyard. Hundreds of pottery vessels, some intact, including special vessels such as a bowl and a cup, were exposed in the rooms of the citadel, which were probably used for worship and a large number of bowls. Some of them were made in the style of imitating Egyptian bowls.

The remains of the citadel were uncovered with the help of students from Eretz Israel from the multidisciplinary school in Be’er Sheva, students from the Nachshon pre-military preparatory school, and many volunteers. This, as part of the Antiquities Authority’s policy to bring the general public, and in particular the younger generation, closer to archeology.

According to Talila Livshitz, director of the community and forest department in the southern part of Keren Kimat LeIsrael, “Galon Fortress provides a fascinating glimpse into the story of a relatively unknown period in the country’s history, and is a tourist and experiential attraction for visitors. South of Keren Kimat LeIsrael, where a parking lot and explanatory signs were erected to enhance the archeological experience in nature and in the JNF forests. This coming Tuesday, August 25, 2020, the site will officially open to the general public. ”

https://www.news1.news/en/2020/08/a-fortress-from-the-time-of-the-judges-was-discovered-near-kiryat-gat-israel-news.html

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