Vai al contenuto
  • Sky
  • Blueberry
  • Slate
  • Blackcurrant
  • Watermelon
  • Strawberry
  • Orange
  • Banana
  • Apple
  • Emerald
  • Chocolate
  • Charcoal
Accedi per seguire questo  
apollonia

Su di alcuni medaglioni imperiali romani

Risposte migliori

apollonia
Supporter

Medaglione Massimino I Tharax Minerva 591744.jpg

PISIDIA, Kremna. Maximinus I Thrax. 235-238 AD. Æ 41mm Medallion (37.72 gm). IMP CAE C IVL VER MAXIMINO A-VG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / MINERVA COL IVL AVG CREM, Athena standing right, holding upturned spear; serpent crawling up shaft from base of spear. SNG von Aulock 5101 (same dies); SNG France -; Cornell 112 (this coin). EF, attractive green patina. ($4000)

From the David Simpson Collection. Ex Bank Leu Auktion 10 (29 May 1974), lot 291.

The reverse of this coin must have been inspired by a magnificent statue of Athena, identified by the Romans with the Italian Minerva, characterised by her animal companion, the Erichthonius serpent, coiled menacingly around the base of her spear. The myth relates that Hephaestus, while making armour for the warrior maid, could not resist the temptation of sexually assaulting her and was repulsed with the result that his semen fell on the ground. A child was born from it and handed by Gaia to Athena to look after, the nearest Athena ever came to having a child of her own. Athena accepted and entrusted the child, in a covered box, to the three daughters of Cecrops to guard with orders not to look inside. They disobeyed, and what they saw so terrified them that they leapt from the Acropolis and killed themselves. It was said that they saw a serpent, or creature half-child and half-serpent, or serpents coiled round a baby. This was Erichthonius, whom Athena took back and brought up in her temple, and who later became king of Athens.

 

Il rovescio di questo medaglione dev’essere stato ispirato da una magnifica statua di Atena, raffigurata in piedi e con in mano una lancia con la punta rivolta verso l’alto e dalla cui base si arrampica un serpente. Il serpente è legato al mito di Atena, Efesto ed Erittonio, che vuole quest’ultimo nato metà uomo e metà serpente in circostanze molto particolari.

 

Poseidone, ancora arrabbiato perché la città di Atene non gli era stata assegnata, aveva convinto Efesto che Atena sarebbe andata da lui con la scusa di un'armatura nuova, ma in effetti per amoreggiare con lui. Atena si recò effettivamente da Efesto desiderosa di farsi fabbricare delle armi, ma questi, da poco abbandonato da Afrodite, preso dal desiderio di possederla, iniziò a inseguirla. Atena fuggì, e quando Efesto riuscì a raggiungerla, resistette alla violenza ma non potè evitare che lui le lanciasse il suo seme addosso, colpendola sulle gambe. La dea inorridì e si pulì con un panno, scagliando del liquido seminale di Efesto a terra. A causa di questo gesto la Terra (Gea) divenne gravida e da questa gravidanza nacque Erittonio. Il neonato rispecchiava l'aspetto deforme del padre avendo due serpenti al posto delle gambe e fu ripudiato sia da Efesto sia da Gea, ma fu adottato da Atena che lo nascose in una cesta per la vergogna delle sue sembianze e lo affidò alle tre figlie di Cécrope - Aglàuro, "la splendente", Erse, "la rugiadosa", e Pàndroso, "la tutta-rugiada" - vietando loro di aprire la cesta. Solo che le fanciulle, incuriosite, vollero vedere che cosa fosse là racchiuso e, alla vista di quel bambino per metà serpente, impazzirono di paura e si gettarono giù dall'Acropoli, o, secondo altri, divennero pietra dall'orrore. Atena, allora, allevò lei stessa Erittonio nel suo tempio fatto costruire da Cécrope, che si chiamò Eretteo, e nel quale, più tardi, venne custodito, per ricordo, un serpente sacro. Divenuto adulto, Eretteo regnò in Atene e, per riconoscenza, istituì le celebri feste Panatenee in onore della dea.

Giovenale firma con inglese ok.jpg

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

apollonia
Supporter

Medaglione Gordiano III e Perseo 10400455.jpg

Perseus Advances on the Sleeping Gorgones

LYDIA, Daldis. Gordian III. AD 238-244. Æ Medallion (48mm, 60.65 g, 6h). L. Aur. Hephaestionos, principal archon for the second time. AVT K • M ANT ΓOPΔIAN[OC], laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / Є–Π • Λ • AVP H–ΦAICTIΩNOC APX A T B, ΔAΛΔIAN/ΩN, Perseus advancing left, approaching the three Gorgon sisters (Stheno, Euryale, and Medusa) sleeping below a tree; winged Hypnos stands behind them; to upper left, Apollo Citharoedus within tetrastyle temple; to lower left, horse standing left, head right. RPC VII.1, 200 (A1/R1); Kraft pl. 45, 57 (same dies). Near EF, brown and green patina, very minor doubling. A beautifully composed and highly enigmatic mythological scene. Extremely rare and exceptional.


Four specimens are noted in RPC, all from the same dies as our massive medallion. This fifth example is the only one in private hands, the others being in Paris (RPC VII.1, pl. 17, 200), Berlin (two specimens, one of which is plated in Kraft), and Boston (NFA XII, lot 389). Our piece is the finest known, far superior to the published examples.

Called the “most-renowned of men” by Homer, Perseus is best known today for his slaying of the Gorgon Medusa. The central scene depicts the Gorgones reclining below a tree, asleep, as the figure of Hypnos makes clear, while Perseus advances on them. The Gorgones are variously described in ancient accounts, but are often said to have had serpents for hair, golden wings, brass claws, and scale-like skin. The great tragedian Aeschylus tells us that they shared one eye, and it was during the shuffling of this organ that Perseus decided to strike, slaying Medusa, the only mortal of the three sisters.

As noted in Lexicon Iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (p. 347), however, the current scene is “unusual and without known parallels.” The temple of Apollo was a major religious center of Daldis. It is uncertain if the temple is merely included as a kind of civic badge, or if it reflects a local tradition that the events of the story occurred in the vicinity of Daldis (RPC p. 149), with this medallion possibly serving as an abbreviated copy of a well-known, though now lost, work of art at Daldis.

 

Il rovescio di questo medaglione è una scena mitologica molto enigmatica: Perseo che avanza a sinistra avvicinandosi alle tre sorelle Gorgoni (Steno ‘la forte’, Euriale ‘la spaziosa’ e Medusa ‘la dominatrice’) che dormono sotto un albero; Ipno (dio tutelare del sonno ristoratore) alato che sta in piedi dietro a loro; in alto a sinistra Apollo citaredo all’interno di un tempio tetrastilo; a sinistra in basso un cavallo in piedi, con la testa rivolta a destra.

 

Definito da Omero ‘il più rinomato degli uomini’, Perseo è più noto oggi come l’uccisore di Medusa. La scena centrale illustra le Gorgoni distese sotto un albero, dormienti come la figura di Ipno dimostra, mentre Perseo avanza verso di loro. Le Gorgoni sono descritte in vari modi nelle antiche descrizioni, ma sono spesso raffigurate con serpenti al posto dei capelli, ali d’oro, artigli di bronzo e pelle a squame. Il grande trageda Eschilo narra che esse condividevano un solo occhio e che fu durante il passaggio di questo organo che Perso decise di uccidere Medea, la sola mortale delle tre sorelle.

 

Il tempio di Apollo era un importante centro religioso a Daldi, ma non si sa se è stato incluso come una sorta di elemento di riconoscimento civico o perché rifletteva la tradizione locale che gli eventi storici avvennero in prossimità di Daldi, con questo medaglione che serviva possibilmente da copia abbreviata di un ben noto, ma ora perso, lavoro artistico della città.

 

 

 

Giovenale firma con inglese ok.jpg

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

apollonia
Supporter

Medaglione Valeriano I Demetra.jpg

Rare Medallion

LYDIA, Sardis. Valerian I. AD 253-260. Æ Medallion - 46mm (42.11 g, 6h). Domitius Rufus asiarch and son of the second asiarch. Radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / Demeter, with billowing veil and holding torch in each hand, standing in biga drawn right by winged serpents. LS -; SNG München -; BMC 206. Good VF, green patina. Very rare.


Among the most ancient of the deities in the Olympian pantheon and with connections to a pre-Hellenic mother earth goddess, Demeter remained connected with fertility in Classical myth as the goddess of grain and crops. According to the Homeric Hymn addressed to her, Demeter, in her day and night search for her abducted daughter Persephone, eventually arrived at Eleusis. In return for the hospitality she received from its king, Celeus, Demeter instructed his son, Triptolemus, in the ways of agriculture. Having received this knowledge, he taught it to the rest of Greece, traveling from place to place in a chariot drawn by flying serpents, chthonic deities connected to Demeter’s ancient past.

 

Sul rovescio di questo medaglione è raffigurata Demetra con un velo svolazzante e tenendo una fiaccola in ciascuna mano, in piedi su una biga trainata da serpenti alati.

 

Tra le più antiche divinità dell’Olimpo in connessione con una dea preellenica madre della Terra, Demetra rimane legata alla fertilità nella mitologia classica come dea del grano e delle messi. Secondo l’inno omerico a lei dedicato, Demetra, nella sua ricerca di giorno e di notte della sua figlia rapita Proserpina, alla fine era arrivata ad Eleusi. Per contraccambiare l’ospitalità ricevuta dal re Celeo, Demetra istruì suo figlio Trittolemo nella pratica dell’agricoltura. Ricevuto questo insegnamento, egli lo diffuse al resto della Grecia, viaggiando da luogo a luogo su un carro trainato da serpenti volanti, divinità ctoniche connesse all’antico passato di Demetra.

Giovenale firma con inglese ok.jpg

  • Mi piace 1

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

apollonia
Supporter

Tellus è la dea romana della Terra, protettrice della fecondità, dei morti e contro i terremoti.

Medaglione Commodo Tellus.jpg

Commodus. AD 177-192. Æ Medallion (53.16 g, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 186-187. M COMMODVS ANTONINVS PIVS FELIX AVG BRIT, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / P M TR P XII IMP VIII CO-S V P P, TELLVS STABIL in exergue, Tellus reclining left, left arm resting on basket of fruit and cradling long vine branch from which hangs grapes above, her right hand placed on star-studded globe, around which are the figures of the Four Seasons. Gnecchi 127 = Cohen 715; MIR 18, 1123-1/37; Banti 389; cf. Grueber 110; cf. Froehner p. 130; Tocci -; cf. Dressel 79; cf. Toynbee p. 93. EF, green-brown patina.


Upon becoming sole Augustus in AD 180, Commodus consciously embarked upon a policy of imperial self promotion. Uppermost at the time was the theme of a restored Golden Age, a theme that had served some of his predecessors to great effect. Deriving, in part, from Virgil’s Fourth Eclogue, the image on this medallion can also find its inspiration in the so-called “Tellus Panel” of the Ara Pacis of Augustus, wherein the figure of Tellus is seated within an arbor of vines, holding two infants. She is thus the symbol of fecundity produced by a long period of peace. The inclusion of the two additional infants, as well as the star-studded globe, complete the allegory. The children represent each of the four seasons, and thus indicate a year or succession of years in which prosperity will continue to flourish. The globe, representing the heavens and, consequently, the extent of empire, alludes to Augustus, who brought about the first imperial Golden Age of peace throughout the world (Virgil, Aeneid VI.790-796). Commodus saw himself overseeing and administering a period of peace and prosperity, similar to that of Augustus. Unfortunately, the reality failed to live up to the expectation. The peace brought about by the end of the Marcomannic Wars failed to last. Harvests failed, causing periodic famine, and the AD 190 fire in Rome heralded the onset of the megalomania that resulted in his assassination two years later.

Giovenale firma con inglese ok.jpg

  • Mi piace 2

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

apollonia
Supporter

Salus era la divinità della Salute nella religione romana, la personificazione dello star bene (salute e prosperità) sia come individuo sia come Res Publica.

Medaglione Faustina Junior Salus.jpg

Proclaiming the Imperial Survival of Another Pregnancy

Faustina Junior. Augusta, AD 147-175. Æ Medallion (37mm, 41.45 g, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 161-175. FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Bareheaded and draped bust left / SALVS in exergue, Salus seated left on throne, adorned by sphinx and griffin, feeding snake uncoiling from branch; to left, column surmounted by statuette. Gnecchi II 3, pl. 67, 3 = Banti 103 (same dies as illustration); MIR 18, 1002-1/20. VF, rough green and red-brown surfaces. Extremely rare.


To the Romans, Salus was the personification of health and the equivalent of the Greek goddess, Hygieia, the daughter of the Greek god of healing, Aesculapius. As such, the role of Salus, like Hygieia, was preventative rather than restorative - she was associated with the prevention of sickness and the continuation of good health - both physical and mental. Consequently, her presence on Roman imperial coinage may be taken as the possible indication of the recovery of the imperial person from some bout of illness or indisposition or, as in the case of Faustina Junior, the recovery from the process of childbirth.

Originally betrothed by her parents, Antoninus Pius and Faustina Senior, to Lucius Verus, Annia Galeria Faustina Minor was subsequently married to Marcus Aurelius in AD 145. Over the next twenty-one years, she produced thirteen children, including the rare birth of two sets of twins - T. Aelius Aurelius and T. Aurelius Antoninus in AD 149 (both subsequently dying before the year was out), and T. Aurelius Fulvus and the future emperor L. Aurelius Commodus in AD 161. Of all her offspring, only three - Lucilla, Cornificia, and Commodus - survived to adulthood. Such repeated pregnancies, even for a woman in the imperial household, were fraught with danger, but, given the number of births which failed to reach adulthood, was necessary in the drive to produce an imperial heir. Faustina’s recovery from childbirth would have been of prime concern for the empire, if she needed to be called upon once again to produce a possible heir.

Giovenale firma con inglese ok.jpg

  • Mi piace 1

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

grigioviola

@apollonia mi complimento per la tematica che stai affrontando. Stai proponendo una serie di opere d'arte più che di monete abbinate poi alla tematica della mitologia classica. Un taglio che, per certi versi, mancava da un po' di tempo tra le discussioni della sezione. Vorrei chiederti, se ti è possibile, di unificare tutte queste discussioni (forse @Reficul può venirci in soccorso in tal senso!) in un unico messaggio e, meglio ancora!, integrare le discussioni con qualche descrizione/commento in italiano (sarebbe utile in tal senso anche solamente riportare la spiegazione del singolo episodio mitologico) in modo tale da favorire il commento e la partecipazione di tutti :)

E' un vero peccato che una carrellata di simili bellezze vada dispersa in discussioni singole con il rischio che molte rimangano prive di risposta o di integrazioni!

Grazie mille e... attendo nuovi contributi!

:)

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

apollonia
Supporter
2 ore fa, grigioviola dice:

@apollonia mi complimento per la tematica che stai affrontando. Stai proponendo una serie di opere d'arte più che di monete abbinate poi alla tematica della mitologia classica. Un taglio che, per certi versi, mancava da un po' di tempo tra le discussioni della sezione. Vorrei chiederti, se ti è possibile, di unificare tutte queste discussioni (forse @Reficul può venirci in soccorso in tal senso!) in un unico messaggio e, meglio ancora!, integrare le discussioni con qualche descrizione/commento in italiano (sarebbe utile in tal senso anche solamente riportare la spiegazione del singolo episodio mitologico) in modo tale da favorire il commento e la partecipazione di tutti :)

E' un vero peccato che una carrellata di simili bellezze vada dispersa in discussioni singole con il rischio che molte rimangano prive di risposta o di integrazioni!

Grazie mille e... attendo nuovi contributi!

:)

@grigioviola

Non so se hai fatto caso che ogni discussione da me aperta su questa tematica riguarda un diverso imperatore (Faustina Junior, Commodo, Valeriano I, Antonino Pio, Gordiano III, Massimino I, Settimio Severo) e che il personaggio mitologico associato a un determinato imperatore è diverso dagli altri (Salus, Tellus, Demetra, Persefone, Perso, Minerva, Efesto).

Per questo motivo ho ritenuto opportuna la trattazione in singole discussioni, in modo che ognuno potesse intervenire argomentando su un determinato imperatore e un determinato personaggio mitologico.

Quanto alla descrizione, direi che la didascalia è esaustiva. Certo, è in inglese…

Il nuovo contributo riguarda Gordiano III ma non ha a che vedere con la mitologia.

 

Giovenale firma con inglese ok.jpg

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

apollonia
Supporter

Sul rovescio sono raffigurate le personificazioni femminili dei tre metalli monetali, oro, argento e bronzo. Il medaglione commemora il tentativo di Gordiano della riforma monetale romana.

Gordiano III e la Tre Monete.jpg

Gordian III. AD 238-244. AR Medallion (30mm, 25.08 g, 12h). Rome mint. Special emission, AD 243. IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / AEQVITAS AVGVSTI, Tres Monetae standing left, each holding a scale and cornucopia; to left of each at feet, a heap of coins. Gnecchi 4/1 (pl. 23, 11) = RIC 133b; RSC 31; Cohen 31. Near EF, traces of gilding in antiquity remaining. Extremely rare.


Only two other examples of this particular type are attested: one in the British Museum (RIC 133b); the other in the Bibliothèque Nationale (Cohen 31). The reverse of this medallion depicts the Tres Monetae, female personifications of the three metals of gold, silver, and bronze, and commemorates Gordian’s attempt to reform the Roman currency.

 

Giovenale firma con inglese ok.jpg

 

  • Mi piace 2

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

grigioviola

Ho compreso il tuo punto di vista. 

cercavo solo di ragionare nell'ottica della fruibilità e utilità del forum. 

Non avrei visto (e continuo a non vedere) una brutta idea quella di radunare questa splendida serie di monete in un'unica discussione dal titolo (la butto lì) "Il mito nei medaglioni imperiali romani".

Radunata e strutturata così a mio avviso avrebbe riscosso un buon seguito nel forum spronando al l'intervento anche altri utenti generalmente più pigri :P

 

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

grigioviola

Qual era, a sommi capi la riforma monetale attuata da Gordiano? 

nell'utile sintesi di 

Non mi sembrava ci fossero accenni a questa riforma (o al tentativo di farla). 

...ammetto che su questo fronte (e pure su molti altri) sono un po' a digiuno... 

  • Mi piace 1

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

apollonia
Supporter
3 minuti fa, grigioviola dice:

Ho compreso il tuo punto di vista. 

cercavo solo di ragionare nell'ottica della fruibilità e utilità del forum. 

Non avrei visto (e continuo a non vedere) una brutta idea quella di radunare questa splendida serie di monete in un'unica discussione dal titolo (la butto lì) "Il mito nei medaglioni imperiali romani".

Radunata e strutturata così a mio avviso avrebbe riscosso un buon seguito nel forum spronando al l'intervento anche altri utenti generalmente più pigri :P

 

Personalmente non ho nulla in contrario alla tua iniziativa e quindi, se qualcuno dello staff può provvedere alla 'riunione' in una discussione, proceda pure. Da parte mia vedrò di introdurre in quelle che ho aperto, singole o riunite che siano, qualche commento sull'aspetto mitologico.

 57f66fcabd7c2_Giovenalefirmaconingleseok.jpg.3e793125fc89691f8c7eeb8be4aff1c9.jpg

  • Mi piace 1

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

Littore

Ho provveduto ad unire le discussioni su richiesta.

Non trattando di mitologia l'intervento sul medaglione di Gordiano, ho inserito un titolo provvisiorio.

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

Illyricum65
Qual era, a sommi capi la riforma monetale attuata da Gordiano? 

nell'utile sintesi di 

Non mi sembrava ci fossero accenni a questa riforma (o al tentativo di farla). 

...ammetto che su questo fronte (e pure su molti altri) sono un po' a digiuno... 


Gordiano III non effettuó riforme monetali su pesi o contenuti di fino. In realtà dopo il suo regno in realtá vi è un cambiamento tra il circolante: quale?

Ciao
Illyricum

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

Legio II Italica
16 minuti fa, Illyricum65 dice:


Gordiano III non effettuó riforme monetali su pesi o contenuti di fino. In realtà dopo il suo regno in realtá vi è un cambiamento tra il circolante: quale?

Ciao
Illyricum
emoji6.png

Ciao , se ricordo bene , durante il regno di Gordiano III avvenne un grosso incremento di emissioni monetali , tanto che le monete di questo Imperatore sono ancora oggi tra le piu' comuni del periodo , questa manovra fu per deflazionare l' economia stagnante , non sappiamo pero' se ebbe i risultati sperati  .

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

grigioviola

Quindi per ritornare al medaglione, la triplice rappresentazione della moneta starebbe a sottolinerare non tanto una vera e propria riforma quanto questa manovra di aumento della produzione in tutti e tre metalli?

Molto interessante!

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

Illyricum65
Ciao , se ricordo bene , durante il regno di Gordiano III avvenne un grosso incremento di emissioni monetali , tanto che le monete di questo Imperatore sono ancora oggi tra le piu' comuni del periodo , questa manovra fu per deflazionare l' economia stagnante , non sappiamo pero' se ebbe i risultati sperati  .


Questo è corretto. Ma andiamo a osservare nel dettaglio gli argenti: una marea di antoniniani e solo 6 tipologie di AR denarius (la serie ricollegata al matrimonio con Tranguillina). E da Gordiano in poi i denari sono pressoché assenti. Resta il termine (vedi Editto di Diocleziano) ma l'AR denarius scompare a favore dell'antoniniano che si svilisce nel tempo.
Ciao
Illyricum

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

apollonia
Supporter

Buondì

Riporto dalla rete questo trafiletto

Per quanto riguarda la monetazione, durante il regno di Gordiano III vigeva ancora la riforma di Caracalla, ma con pesi ridotti, come, in assenza di fonti scritte, si desume dall’esame statistico delle monete pervenute fino a noi. Tale esame porta a definire come pesi teorici rispettivamente per l’Aureo 5,45 g, per l’Antoniniano 4,54 g e per il Denaro d’argento 3,03 g, mentre resta teoricamente invariato lo standard per il Sesterzio e le altre monete in lega di rame, anche se di fatto prosegue la loro diminuzione di peso e di diametro. E’ importante notare che, a partire dagli ultimi anni del regno di Gordiano III, l’Antoniniano, pur diminuendo progressivamente di titolo, resta l’unica moneta definibile d’argento, mentre il Denaro, ridotto nel titolo al solo valore di 50, diviene in brevissimo tempo una monetina di bronzo dal potere d’acquisto estremamente limitato.

Giovenale firma con inglese ok.jpg

  • Mi piace 1

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

apollonia
Supporter

Aggiungo che la raffigurazione delle Tres Monetae caratterizza il rovescio di medaglioni di molti altri imperatori oltre a Gordiano III: Commodo, Settimio Severo, Gallieno, Valeriano I, Floriano, Probo, Claudio II il Gotico, Galerio come Cesare.

Nel caso degli ultimi due imperatori, a commento della figura si dice che le personificazioni femminili dei tre metalli monetali compaiono regolarmente sui medaglioni imperiali durante la crisi economica della seconda metà del terzo secolo e riflettono gli sforzi di una serie di imperatori per rilanciare l’economia attraverso la riforma monetaria.

Giovenale firma con inglese ok.jpg

Modificato da apollonia

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

apollonia
Supporter

Posto il medaglione di Claudio II il Gotico battuto alla Triton XI (Estimate $25000. Sold For $18750), dove il commento sulla raffigurazione del rovescio è più articolato.

Medaglione di Claudio II il Gotico.jpg

Impressive Claudius Gothicus Medallion

Claudius II Gothicus. AD 268-270. Æ Medallion (32.27 g, 6h). Rome mint. IMP CAES CLAVDIVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind / MONETA AVG, the three Monetae standing facing, heads left, each holding cornucopia in their left hand, scale in their right above a stack of coins at their feet. Gnecchi II 3, pl. CXVII, 2 (same obv. die); Grueber 237; Froehner p. 234; Tocci 108, pl. LII, 73 (same rev. die); Dressel -; Toynbee pl. XLVII, 1 (same rev. die). Good VF, brown patina, traces of original gilding, light smoothing in fields. Very rare.

 

The reverse of this medallion depicts the tres Monetae, female personifications of the three metals of gold, silver, and bronze, and commemorates the attempt of Claudius II to reform Roman currency. When Claudius II took the throne on the death of Gallienus in 268 AD, the Roman Empire had reached a low point. In addition to the numerous internal and external rebellions, the economy was in a state of near-collapse. While gold aurei still continued to be struck in order to pay the army, silver denarii and antoniniani, as well as the earlier large bronze denominations, had disappeared completely. In their place, near-billon antoniniani had become the medium of daily exchange. These too, however, were being reduced in size and silver content. Claudius II seems to have planned a reform of the currency, and he also began minting a wide variety of reverse types which emphasized traditional divine protection and renewal of Roman power. Unfortunately, the early death of Claudius delayed the anticipated monetary reformation, which his successor, Aurelian, would carry through.

Il rovescio di questa medaglia raffigura le Tres Monetae, personificazioni femminili delle tre metalli oro, argento e bronzo, e commemora il tentativo di Claudio II di riformare la moneta romana. Quando Claudio II salì al trono alla morte di Gallieno nel 268 d. C., l'impero romano aveva raggiunto un livello basso. Oltre alle numerose rivolte interne ed esterne, l'economia era in uno stato di quasi collasso. Mentre gli aurei in oro continuavano a essere coniati per pagare l'esercito, i denari d'argento e gli antoniniani, così come le precedenti denominazioni di grandi dimensioni in bronzo, erano scomparsi del tutto. Al loro posto, quasi un miliardo di antoniniani erano diventati il mezzo di scambio quotidiano. Anche questi, però, erano ridotti nelle dimensioni e nel contenuto di argento. Claudio II sembra aver pianificato una riforma della valuta, e aveva anche cominciato a coniare una vasta gamma di tipi di rovescio che sottolineava la tradizionale protezione divina e il rinnovamento della potenza romana. Purtroppo, la morte prematura di Claudio ha ritardato l’anticipata riforma monetaria che il suo successore, Aureliano, avrebbe portato a compimento.

 

Giovenale firma con inglese ok.jpg

 

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

apollonia
Supporter

Il rovescio di questo medaglione dev’essere stato ispirato da una magnifica statua di Atena, raffigurata in piedi e con in mano una lancia con la punta rivolta verso l’alto e dalla cui base si arrampica un serpente. Il serpente è legato al mito di Atena, Efesto ed Erittonio, che vuole quest’ultimo nato metà uomo e metà serpente in circostanze molto particolari.

Poseidone, ancora arrabbiato perché la città di Atene non gli era stata assegnata, aveva convinto Efesto che Atena sarebbe andata da lui con la scusa di un'armatura nuova, ma in effetti per amoreggiare con lui. Atena si recò effettivamente da Efesto desiderosa di farsi fabbricare delle armi, ma questi, da poco abbandonato da Afrodite, preso dal desiderio di possederla, iniziò a inseguirla. Atena fuggì, e quando Efesto riuscì a raggiungerla, resistette alla violenza ma non potè evitare che lui le lanciasse il suo seme addosso, colpendola sulle gambe. La dea inorridì e si pulì con un panno, scagliando del liquido seminale di Efesto a terra. A causa di questo gesto la Terra (Gea) divenne gravida e da questa gravidanza nacque Erittonio. Il neonato rispecchiava l'aspetto deforme del padre avendo due serpenti al posto delle gambe e fu ripudiato sia da Efesto sia da Gea, ma fu adottato da Atena che lo nascose in una cesta per la vergogna delle sue sembianze e lo affidò alle tre figlie di Cécrope - Aglàuro, "la splendente", Erse, "la rugiadosa", e Pàndroso, "la tutta-rugiada" - vietando loro di aprire la cesta. Solo che le fanciulle, incuriosite, vollero vedere che cosa fosse là racchiuso e, alla vista di quel bambino per metà serpente, impazzirono di paura e si gettarono giù dall'Acropoli, o, secondo altri, divennero pietra dall'orrore. Atena, allora, allevò lei stessa Erittonio nel suo tempio fatto costruire da Cécrope, che si chiamò Eretteo, e nel quale, più tardi, venne custodito, per ricordo, un serpente sacro. Divenuto adulto, Eretteo regnò in Atene e, per riconoscenza, istituì le celebri feste Panatenee in onore della dea.

Giovenale firma con inglese ok.jpg

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

King John
Supporter

Moneta di Cizico che raffigura Cecrope.

MYSIA, Kyzikos. 5th-4th century BC. Hekte (Electrum, 10mm, 2.64 g). Kekrops to left, his body ending in a coiled serpent’s tail, leaning on an olive branch held in his right hand, his left at his side; below, tunny fish to left. Rev. Quadripartite incuse square. Cf. BMFA 1499 (stater). SNG France 306. Von Fritze I, 158. A fine example of this unusual and rare type. Nearly extremely fine.
From a European collection.
Kekrops was the mythological first king of Attica; he was born from the Earth and his body ended in a serpent’s tail rather than legs. He appears on Athenian Red Figure pottery and his statue was in the West Pediment of the Parthenon. On this coin he is holding the olive tree that Athena gave to Athens during her contest with Poseidon for the city’s allegiance. As the story goes, Poseidon offered a salt-water spring on the Acropolis and Athena presented the olive: Kekrops chose Athena’s gift and, thus, Athena became the city’s patroness and was named after her. The fact that this distinctly Athenian myth should appear on the coinage of Kyzikos can be explained by the close ties between the two cities.

2666079.jpg

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

King John
Supporter

La moneta del post precedente fa il paio con questa che raffigura Gea che ha tra le braccia Erittonio.

GREEK COINS
MYSIA
No.: 144
Estimate: $ 8500
d=20 mm
CYZICUS. Stater, electrum, about 440-415 BC. EL 16.03 g. Gaia, emerging from the earth r., hair in sphendone, wearing sleeveless girdled chiton and shawl, holding in her outstretched hands her son Erichthonios, nude, his arms outstretched; below, tunny r. Rev. Similar to previous. Von Fritze 12, 157 and pl. V, 5. Boston 1500. Very rare and interesting mythological theme. Short flan.
Good very fine
Erichthonios was the son of Hephaestus and Gaia (or Ge = Earth in Greek); after he was born, he was entrusted by Athena in a chest to Agraulos, Herse and Pondrosos, daughters of Kekrops, first king of Athens; they were told not to open the lid of the chest. They violated this direction and found Erichthonios as serpent. The serpent pursued them and, struck by madness, they jumped off the Acropolis. Erichthonios was raised in the temple of Athena and was crowned king of Athens after the death of Kekrops.

278242.jpg

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

apollonia
Supporter
Il 24/1/2017 at 18:44, apollonia dice:

Sul rovescio sono raffigurate le personificazioni femminili dei tre metalli monetali, oro, argento e bronzo. Il medaglione commemora il tentativo di Gordiano della riforma monetale romana.

 

Gordiano III e la Tre Monete.jpg

Gordian III. AD 238-244. AR Medallion (30mm, 25.08 g, 12h). Rome mint. Special emission, AD 243. IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / AEQVITAS AVGVSTI, Tres Monetae standing left, each holding a scale and cornucopia; to left of each at feet, a heap of coins. Gnecchi 4/1 (pl. 23, 11) = RIC 133b; RSC 31; Cohen 31. Near EF, traces of gilding in antiquity remaining. Extremely rare.

 


Only two other examples of this particular type are attested: one in the British Museum (RIC 133b); the other in the Bibliothèque Nationale (Cohen 31). The reverse of this medallion depicts the Tres Monetae, female personifications of the three metals of gold, silver, and bronze, and commemorates Gordian’s attempt to reform the Roman currency.

 

Giovenale firma con inglese ok.jpg

 

 

 

Volevo far notare che le tre donne in piedi a sinistra che personificano le monete hanno una bilancia nella mano destra e una cornucopia nella mano sinistra. Ai piedi di ciascuna di esse, a sinistra, si trova un mucchio di monete.

La scritta sul bordo ‘AEQVITAS AVGVSTI’ è caratteristica di questo medaglione di Gordiano III in quanto, su quelli degli altri imperatori con le tre ‘signore’, la scritta è, variamente abbreviata, ‘MONETA AVGVSTI’.

Giovenale firma con inglese ok.jpg

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

apollonia
Supporter
Il 24/1/2017 at 14:15, apollonia dice:

Salus era la divinità della Salute nella religione romana, la personificazione dello star bene (salute e prosperità) sia come individuo sia come Res Publica.

 

Medaglione Faustina Junior Salus.jpg

Proclaiming the Imperial Survival of Another Pregnancy

 

Faustina Junior. Augusta, AD 147-175. Æ Medallion (37mm, 41.45 g, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 161-175. FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Bareheaded and draped bust left / SALVS in exergue, Salus seated left on throne, adorned by sphinx and griffin, feeding snake uncoiling from branch; to left, column surmounted by statuette. Gnecchi II 3, pl. 67, 3 = Banti 103 (same dies as illustration); MIR 18, 1002-1/20. VF, rough green and red-brown surfaces. Extremely rare.

 


To the Romans, Salus was the personification of health and the equivalent of the Greek goddess, Hygieia, the daughter of the Greek god of healing, Aesculapius. As such, the role of Salus, like Hygieia, was preventative rather than restorative - she was associated with the prevention of sickness and the continuation of good health - both physical and mental. Consequently, her presence on Roman imperial coinage may be taken as the possible indication of the recovery of the imperial person from some bout of illness or indisposition or, as in the case of Faustina Junior, the recovery from the process of childbirth.

Originally betrothed by her parents, Antoninus Pius and Faustina Senior, to Lucius Verus, Annia Galeria Faustina Minor was subsequently married to Marcus Aurelius in AD 145. Over the next twenty-one years, she produced thirteen children, including the rare birth of two sets of twins - T. Aelius Aurelius and T. Aurelius Antoninus in AD 149 (both subsequently dying before the year was out), and T. Aurelius Fulvus and the future emperor L. Aurelius Commodus in AD 161. Of all her offspring, only three - Lucilla, Cornificia, and Commodus - survived to adulthood. Such repeated pregnancies, even for a woman in the imperial household, were fraught with danger, but, given the number of births which failed to reach adulthood, was necessary in the drive to produce an imperial heir. Faustina’s recovery from childbirth would have been of prime concern for the empire, if she needed to be called upon once again to produce a possible heir.

 

 

Giovenale firma con inglese ok.jpg

A differenza degli altri medaglioni che ho postato, questo è dedicato non all’imperatore ma all’imperatrice in carica, precisamente Faustina Junior Leggo nella descrizione che Faustina jr, nome completo Anna Galeria Faustina Minor, era stata promessa in sposa a Lucio Vero dai genitori Antonino Pio e Faustina Senior, ma poi s’era maritata con Marco Aurelio nel 145 d. C. Nel corso dei ventun anni successivi Faustina aveva messo al mondo tredici pargoli, inclusa la rara nascita di due coppie di gemelli – T. Elio Aurelio e T. Aurelio Antonino nel 149 (che però morirono senza raggiungere il primo anno d’età) e T. Aurelio Fulvo e il futuro imperatore L. Aurelio Commodo nel 161. Di tutta la sua prole solo due figlie, Lucilla e Cornuficia, e il figlio Commodo vissero fino all’età adulta. Questi parti ripetuti rendevano molta rischiosa un’ulteriore nascita allo scopo di portare alla luce un erede imperiale. Come augurio di un altro parto con esito felice, è stato dedicato all’imperatrice questo medaglione con la raffigurazione di Salus, per i Romani la dea personificazione della salute, seduta sul trono ornato da una sfinge e un grifone.

Salus è equivalente alla dea greca Igiea o Igea, la figlia di Asclepio, divinizzazione della salute fisica e spirituale, alla quale era sacro il serpente che nelle rappresentazioni beveva in un boccale da lei sorretto come si vede sul rovescio del medaglione. Come quello di Igea, il ruolo di Salus era di prevenzione piuttosto che di ristabilimento in salute, essendo la dea associata alla prevenzione delle malattie e alla prosecuzione dello stato di buona salute, sia fisica sia mentale. Ne consegue che la sua presenza sulle monete imperiali romane si può intendere come possibile indicazione di recupero di un familiare da una malattia o un’indisposizione, o, nel caso di Faustina Junior, di recupero della capacità di procreazione.

Giovenale firma con inglese ok.jpg

Condividi questo messaggio


Link di questo messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

Crea un account o accedi per lasciare un commento

Devi essere registrato per lasciare un commento

Crea un account

Iscriviti per un nuovo account nella nostra comunità. È facile!

Registra un nuovo account

Accedi

Sei già registrato? Accedi qui.

Accedi Ora
Accedi per seguire questo  

Lamoneta.it

La più grande comunità online di numismatica e monete. Studiosi, collezionisti e semplici appassionati si scambiano informazioni e consigli sul fantastico mondo della numismatica.

Hai bisogno di aiuto?

×